Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In Excel, I want to write this formula:

=Sheet1!$A$1:$C$9

using an input of seperate cells containing the integer coordinates: 1, 1, 3, 9.

How can I solve this problem with using worksheet functions? (Not VBA code)

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

These might be in the wrong order, but:

=SUM(INDIRECT(ADDRESS(1,1) & ":" & ADDRESS(3,9)))
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it works but I need to know how to merge such a statement with a reference to another sheet. Ex: =SUM(Sheet1!INDIRECT(ADDRESS(1,1) & ":" & ADDRESS(3,9))) which returns error – karamell Jul 2 '13 at 10:52
    
=SUM(INDIRECT("Sheet1!" & ADDRESS(1,1) & ":" & ADDRESS(3,9))) does the trick. Thanks to everyone. – karamell Jul 2 '13 at 11:02

Is the sheet name a given? Assuming yes then try using OFFSET like this:

=OFFSET(Sheet1!$A$1,Z1-1,Z2-1,Z3,Z4)

Where Z1 to Z4 contain, 1 (for start row position), 1 (for start column position), 9 ( for height of range) and 3 (for width of range) respectively.

First argument is always A1

If you want 3 and 9 to represent end point rather than size then use Z3-Z1+1 and Z4- Z2+1

If you can't make that work then a less ambiguous set of input values would be useful - what range do you expect if inputs are 4, 5, 6 and 7?

Note that to "see" the output you need to use the OFFSET function in context, e.g. within a function that expects a range like SUM

share|improve this answer
    
I get #REF! (invalid reference error) when trying the formula you stated. But if I type in the numbers directely instead of the cell names, I get the value of A1. Yes, the sheet has a pre-defined name. – karamell Jul 2 '13 at 9:40
    
I'm surprised you get #REF! did you use exactly the formula I suggested? If you use OFFSET on it's own in a single cell then you can't see the whole contents (because OFFSET is returning a range and you can't see that in one cell). What is displayed depends on where you put the formula. To see exactly what is returned select the cell with the formula, press F2 and then F9 – barry houdini Jul 2 '13 at 10:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.