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We use karma to unit test our angular services, these services contains $http calls, so we have a mocked $httpbackend in place so we can run the app without server and db. this works fine, a service can call $http("someurl?id=1234") and we get the right data back.

But when we try to do the same thing in unit tests, we can't get it to work, the promise never resolves, when it involves $http

The service:

getAllowedTypes: function (contentId) {
    var deferred = $q.defer();
    $http.get(getChildContentTypesUrl(contentId))
        .success(function (data, status, headers, config) {
            deferred.resolve(data);
        }).
        error(function (data, status, headers, config) {
            deferred.reject('Failed to retreive data for content id ' + contentId);
        });
    return deferred.promise;
}

The mocked $httpbackend

$httpBackend
   .whenGET(mocksUtills.urlRegex('/someurl'))
   .respond(returnAllowedChildren); //returns a json object and httpstatus:200

The test

it('should return a allowed content type collection given a document id', function(){

    var collection;
    contentTypeResource.getAllowedTypes(1234).then(function(result){
        collection = result;
    });

    $rootScope.$digest();

    expect(collection.length).toBe(3);
});

but collection is undefined, .then() is never called.

tried pretty much everything to get the promise to resolve, $rootScope.$apply(), $digest, $httpBacke.flush(), but nothing works

So mocked $httpBackend works when called from controllers in app, but not when services is called directly in karma unit tests

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should not need to digest twice, since $httpBackend.flush() calls digest itself. You have to make the call, call digest to resolve the request interceptors, the call flush.

Here is a working Plnkr: http://plnkr.co/edit/FiYY1jT6dYrDhroRpFG1?p=preview

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Kees de Kooter made a comment in another answer below that $rootScope is not required. I forked the plunkr and commented all $rootScope usages. The test still passes: plnkr.co/edit/4ladJi7TAQ4sFdzuGmDr?p=preview –  chashi Jun 27 at 16:19

In your case, you have to $digest twice, once for $httpBackend, and again for your own deferred.

So:

it('should return a allowed content type collection given a document id', function(){

    var collection;
    contentTypeResource.getAllowedTypes(1234).then(function(result){
        collection = result;
    });
    $httpBackend.flush();
    $rootScope.$digest();

    expect(collection.length).toBe(3);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Tried .flush() already, but gets: "Error: No pending request to flush !" this seems to be a common error since 1.1.4: github.com/angular/angular.js/issues/2431 –  Per Ploug Jul 2 '13 at 8:41
    
The order is incorrect here, you need to $digest before you flush. –  Richard Morgan Jul 10 at 22:24

You're almost there. In your case, you just need to force a digest cycle before flushing the HTTP backend. See sample code below.

it('should return a allowed content type collection given a document id', function(){

    var collection;
    contentTypeResource.getAllowedTypes(1234).then(function(result){
        collection = result;
    });

    $rootScope.$digest();
    $httpBackend.flush();
    expect(collection.length).toBe(3);
});
share|improve this answer
    
it's .flush() no .$flush() btw, and nope, doesnt work, get "No pending request to flush" error, see: github.com/angular/angular.js/issues/2431 –  Per Ploug Jul 2 '13 at 12:02
1  
$rootScope.$digest() is IMO not necessary if you are testing a service in isolation. –  Kees de Kooter Jul 9 '13 at 10:31

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