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I have a grid that has 4 Stackpanel child. I want to make visible other 3 stack panel with clicking first stackpanel and make collapsed them with clicking them. I am using Tap event in Stackpanel but it is not handled in empty parts of stackpanels.

How can I do it for full part of StackPanel?

My StackPanel

<StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"> 
<TextBlock Foreground="Gray" FontSize="12" FontFamily="Arial Black" x:Uid="LastDateofEntry" Margin="0,0,3,0" FontWeight="SemiBold" />
<TextBlock Foreground="Gray" FontSize="12" FontFamily="Arial Black" Text="{Binding LastVisitDateTime}"/> 
</StackPanel>
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possible duplicate of How can I use tap event in Stackpanel's empty party? – chue x Jul 2 '13 at 20:08

You may have discovered a gotcha in Microsoft's UI frameworks, whereby if there's no visual element to touch/click, then no interactions are detected.

In many of my control templates, I've added invisible rectangles behind things with tiny positive opacity to get around this issue.

In your case, you seem to have visual elements, but the element probably doesn't stretch the full width of the container.

You might want to add a coloured background to see where the element ends and then experiment with widths or placing the StackPanels in their own (full-width) Grids, perhaps also needing a background rectangle or a background colour set with 0.1 alpha, possibly.

In short: your elements probably stop short of the full width so there's nothing to tap. Watch out for elements that are logically on screen but have been optimised away and are untappable, need tricks to force them back in.

Update

Here's some demo code for your situation:

    <Grid Grid.Row="1">
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition />
            <RowDefinition />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>

        <Grid Grid.Row="0" Background="DarkBlue">
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <TextBlock>Mace</TextBlock>
                <TextBlock>Pepper</TextBlock>
            </StackPanel>
        </Grid>
        <Grid Grid.Row="1" Background="DarkGreen">
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <TextBlock>Basil</TextBlock>
                <TextBlock>Oregano</TextBlock>
            </StackPanel>
        </Grid>
    </Grid>

Here, a grid represents each item in the 'list'. You're using a 4 row Grid as a form of list, right?

A good practice is to place 'groups' of visual elements inside a base grid first. Don't worry about using too many, if you ever see the visual tree of a rendered page, you'll see there can be hundreds or thousands of grids, without much performance hit.

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You are right, I thought that too but How can I do it's design dynamic? For example, my first Stackpanel is <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"> <TextBlock Foreground="Gray" FontSize="12" FontFamily="Arial Black" x:Uid="LastDateofEntry" Margin="0,0,3,0" FontWeight="SemiBold" /> <TextBlock Foreground="Gray" FontSize="12" FontFamily="Arial Black" Text="{Binding LastVisitDateTime}"/> </StackPanel> My textblock is binding from code behind. – Tuğrul Emre Atalay Jul 2 '13 at 7:48
    
So you make the design coloured while working with it, just so you can see the boundaries and where everything really is, then remove/change the colours when the hit-testing works. – Luke Puplett Jul 2 '13 at 7:50
    
I don't understand the question in the comment. – Luke Puplett Jul 2 '13 at 7:52
    
I wrote my Stack Panel, how can I add this element in that? – Tuğrul Emre Atalay Jul 2 '13 at 7:54
    
I would place each StackPanel inside a Grid, first. The Grid will stretch the full width and become the tap target, the 'root' visual for each item in the list. You may have to give the Grid a tiny alpha background colour (try it without first). – Luke Puplett Jul 2 '13 at 8:00

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