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So, I have a keys.txt file that list each key (one per line) e.g.

VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_LABEL  
VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_DESCR  
VIEW_ACCOUNT_STREET_LABEL  
VIEW_ACCOUNT_CITY_SUBURB_LABEL  
VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP_POSTCODE_LABEL  
VIEW_ACCOUNT_COUNTRY_LABEL

And a variety of matching language files, that provide values for the keys, like this en-GB.view.acccount.ini which have one entry per line, like this:

VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_LABEL="Name:"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_DESCR="Name of the account holder."
VIEW_ACCOUNT_STREET_LABEL="Street:"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_CITY_SUBURB_LABEL="City/Suburb:"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP="Zip Code"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_COUNTRY_LABEL="Country"

n.b. there are many key and language files, and actual files have a lot more entries — usually over 1000 per language.

I need to be able to find

  1. Which keys are missing from the language file (e.g. VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP_POSTCODE_LABEL)
  2. Which keys are in the language file but not in the key file (usually obsolete keys such as VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP)

For the first requirement I tried using grep with the -v invert-match option but the results are not what I expected:

cppl ~ grep -v --file=keys.txt en-GB.view.acccount.ini
VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_LABEL="Name:"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_DESCR="Name of the account holder."
VIEW_ACCOUNT_STREET_LABEL="Street:"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_CITY_SUBURB_LABEL="City/Suburb:"
VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP="Zip Code"
cppl ~ 
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3 Answers 3

Use comm.

To find which keys are missing from the language file:

$ comm -23 <(sort keys.txt) <(cut -d= -f1 en-GB.view.acccount.ini | sort) 
VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP_POSTCODE_LABEL

To find which keys are in the language file but not in the key file:

$ comm -13 <(sort keys.txt) <(cut -d= -f1 en-GB.view.acccount.ini | sort)
VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP
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I like it. The use of comm seems more suited to this exact task than the approach I had in mind. –  Austin Phillips Jul 2 '13 at 8:12
    
Thanks for the answer, but I'm not getting the same results. If I understand this correctly, both files are sorted then passed back to comm. The language file is passed through cut to return just the keys before sorting, so comm is effectively comparing two sets of keys. Which all makes perfect sense, except I'm getting this: cppl ~ comm -23 <(sort keys.txt) <(cut -d= -f1 en-GB.view.acccount.ini | sort) VIEW_ACCOUNT_CITY_SUBURB_LABEL VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_DESCR VIEW_ACCOUNT_NAME_LABEL VIEW_ACCOUNT_STREET_LABEL VIEW_ACCOUNT_ZIP_POSTCODE_LABEL –  cppl Jul 2 '13 at 11:35
    
do you have any trailing spaces in the keys file? You will have to remove them if so. Try comm -23 <(sed 's/ *//g' keys.txt | sort) <(cut -d= -f1 en-GB.view.acccount.ini | sort) –  dogbane Jul 2 '13 at 13:30

You can use the standard unix utilities join and uniq to do this. Here's one way to do it.

I'll assume your key file is named file1 in the following examples.

Produce files that just contain the keys, not the values.

sed 's/=.*//' en-GB.view.acccount.ini > file2

You now have file1 and file2 containing just keys. For this example:

$ cat file1
A
B
C
D

$ cat file2
C
D
E

You can now use a combination of join, sort and uniq to get your desired output.

# Keys which are common to both files.
$ join file1 file2 | cat - file1 | sort | uniq -d
C
D

# Keys in file1 but not in file2
$ join file1 file2 | cat - file1 | sort | uniq -u
A
B

# Keys in file2 but not in file1
$ join file1 file2 | cat - file2 | sort | uniq -u
E
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Are you able to use perl for this? If so, perl makes this super easy. Here's a quick-and-dirty script I whipped up. Modify to suit your tastes.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

# usage:  validate keys.txt file1.ini [file2.ini [file3.ini [...]]]

open my $keys_file, "<", $ARGV[0] or die "cannot open $ARGV[0] for reading";

my %keys = ( map { chomp; s/\s//g; $_ => 0 } <$keys_file> );

close $keys_file;

sub validate_file
{
    my $filename = shift @_;
    my (@missing, @unexpected, @repeated);
    my %seen = %keys;

    open my $f, "<", $filename or die "cannot open $filename for reading";

    foreach my $line (<$f>)
    {
        chomp $line;

        if ($line =~ /\s*([^=]+)="[^"]*"/)
        {
            if (!defined $seen{$1})
            {
                push @unexpected, $1;
                $seen{$1} = 0;
            }
            $seen{$1}++;
        }
    }

    @missing  = grep { $seen{$_} == 0 } sort keys %keys;
    @repeated = grep { $seen{$_} >  1 } sort keys %keys;

    return \@missing, \@unexpected, \@repeated;
}


shift @ARGV;

foreach my $file (@ARGV)
{
    my ($missing, $unexpected, $repeated) = validate_file($file);

    print "\nFile $file:\n";
    print "Missing keys:\n", join("\n", @$missing), "\n";
    print "Unexpected keys:\n", join("\n", @$unexpected), "\n";
    print "Repeated keys:\n", join("\n", @$repeated), "\n";
}
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