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I am implementing a program that uses the Python Numpy package. I am trying to modify the elements of an array so that I simply take elem[i][j] and set it to elem[i][j]/10. However, I keep getting some sort of truncation where the elements are set to 0 after the operation. Here is my code:

for  word in allwords:
    for x in xrange(wordarrays[word].shape[0]):
        for y in xrange(wordarrays[word].shape[1]):
            wordarrays[word][x][y]=wordarrays[word][x][y]/10

In my code wordarrays is a dictionary from strings to arrays. When I simply print wordarrays[word][x][y]/10 truncation is not a problem and the float division proceeds as expected. I have checked and the arrays all have dtype=float64 so that shouldn't be the problem. I also tried modifying the array through the method presented here using 'nditer': http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/arrays.nditer.html

What is causing this truncation? Thanks for the help!

-------------------Edit-------------------

To give some more detail regarding my unusual output. Before the division, the entries of wordarray['chen'] are as follows:

[[2. 3.]
 [4. 1.]]

After the division by 10 (or 10.0) I get this for the same array:

[[1.01000000e-04   1.20000000e-05]
[1.11001000e-01   1.00000000e-06]]

Which doesn't seem to make any sense. I recognize that the double for-loops aren't that pythonic but this was what I thought to try when iterating with np.nditer didn't work. To address some of the comments, I did try dividing by both 10 and 10.0. The outcome was the same.

Also, when I perform the same operation without replacing the entries of the array and just print the division, i.e.:

for  word in allwords:
  for x in xrange(wordarrays[word].shape[0]):
     for y in xrange(wordarrays[word].shape[1]):
            print wordarrays[word][x][y]/10

I get what is expected, namely:

[[0.2 0.3]
 [0.4 0.1]]
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1  
What do you mean, truncation? Can you illustrate your problem? Are you sure it's not a problem of display (ie, that the underlying data is actually not truncated)? –  Pierre GM Jul 2 '13 at 8:35
2  
Side note: using loops isn't really numpythonic, you should probably be able to achieve the same result with wordarrays[word]/=10 (provided the in-place division works OK with your dtype) –  Pierre GM Jul 2 '13 at 8:37
    
Are you sure allwords contain UNIQUE word elements? –  heltonbiker Jul 2 '13 at 18:39
    
Yes, it was instantiated as a set. –  MEric Jul 2 '13 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

You can significantly improve your performance doing this:

for word in allwords:
    wordarrays[word] /= 10.
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1  
Just an observation about the trick: everytime you put a decimal separator (.) after a literal number, this makes python interpreter to consider it a float instead of an integer, even if you don't put an implicit 0 after the decimal separator. –  heltonbiker Jul 2 '13 at 18:37

I assume it's because you are dividing by an Integer and so Integer arithmetic is being performed. Try changing 10 to 10.0.

e.g

for word in allwords:
    for x in xrange(wordarrays[word].shape[0]):
        for y in xrange(wordarrays[word].shape[1]):
            wordarrays[word][x][y]=wordarrays[word][x][y] / 10.0
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