Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

This is my first time attempting to write a program that makes use of multithreading, so I have several questions regarding the use of concurrency in my program.

My program takes user input from a web UI, and then starts a process with that user input. I know I have to make use of concurrency because this process takes upwards of an hour, and I cannot possibly have the user wait for one process to complete before starting the next.

The following simplified code handles the user input and then starts the process.

protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException {
    String myInput = request.getParameter("input");
    Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(myInput));
    t.start();

    response.setContentType("text/html");
    PrintWriter out = response.getWriter();
    out.println("Process started!");
    out.close();
}

The following code is a simplification of my actual process.

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

    private static HashMap<String,String> mapOfConstants = null;

    private String member;

    public MyRunnable(String member) {
        this.member = member;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        if (mapOfConstants == null) init();
        // and so on...
    }

    private void init() {
        mapOfConstants = new HashMap<String,String>();
        mapOfConstants.put("LOCATION", "http://localhost/folder");
        // and so on...
    }

}

In my code above, I intend to define a series of placeholders as a constant, which will be stored in the HashMap mapOfConstants.

EDIT: Eventually I might want to make it such that initialization of this map take values from elsewhere, say a text file.

Does my code achieve the purpose of sharing this placeholder map across all instances of MyRunnable, doing this initialization process only once?

share|improve this question
    
For starters you could make your map final and initialize it at declaration time. – fge Jul 2 '13 at 9:25
1  
Please don't ask for multiple answers in one Stack Overflow question. Edit your question to include just one question and post a follow-up question if necessary. – Duncan Jul 2 '13 at 9:27
    
Edited my question and clarified my intentions – ohseekay Jul 2 '13 at 9:32

If you want to share the constants between all users then you'Re on the right path BUT you have to synchronize your code then.

The easiest way to synchronize your code is to write

public synchronized void run() {
}

Please read some tutorial about synchronizing in Java because this is a minefield in Java where even seasoned developers have sometimes problems.

For your second question: Please write a new one.

share|improve this answer

I am answering your question 1 and you should post another question for 2.

Does my code achieve the purpose of sharing this placeholder map across all instances of MyRunnable, doing this initialization process only once?

Yes but it is not thread safe. So you have two options:

My answer assumes that you do not want to change map contents at runtime as you have told that it is a map of constants.

  • Option 1: make the map final and use Collections.unmodifiableMap and initialize it in static block, which makes your code thread safe too.

  • Option 2: (Synchronization) If you want to use lazy initialization which is clearly not required here then you will have to make your code thread safe. Your code is not thread safe.

Reason: Multiple running threads can see the map as null and call init, which will initialize map multiple times. Use synchronized block.

//keeping map `volatile`
private static volatile HashMap<String,String> mapOfConstants = null;

...
if(map == null)
  synchronized(SomeClass.class){
     if(map == null){
        init();
     }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't this kind of double-checked locking be deprecated? cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html – infgeoax Jul 2 '13 at 9:34
    
@infgeoax see the section fixing double checked locking using volatile, what it does with helper I have used map instead of Helper. I think this should work. Still tell me if it is broken, I will fix the code for tht. – Narendra Pathai Jul 2 '13 at 9:38
1  
How does making the map final make the code threadsafe? I can still alter the contents of the map at runtime can't I? I just can't replace the Map with a different one? – DaveH Jul 2 '13 at 9:40
    
@DaveHowes The question says that it is a map of CONSTANTS. So I have assumed that it is altered at initialization time only and not during runtime. – Narendra Pathai Jul 2 '13 at 9:42
    
Fair enough - just wanted to make sore that my understanding of final was correct. – DaveH Jul 2 '13 at 9:44

I know this won't receive a strong reception, but your code is almost okay. Despite not being strictly thread safe (in terms of loading the properties just once) it can still be correct (in terms of not creating corrupt data).

The big change would be this:

private void init() {
    HashMap<String,String> tempMap = new HashMap<String,String>(); // <--- new object assigned to a placeholder variable
    tempMap.put("LOCATION", "http://localhost/folder");
    // and so on...
    mapOfConstants = Collections.unmodifiableMap(tempMap); // <--- atomic assignment here
}

Assuming that mapOfConstants is actually some standard set of properties which will be loaded from a file and never changed, the big "risk" is that the first few tasks will each think the map is null and each load it. As your code was written, the further risk is that multiple threads would be modifying it concurrently. Using the above modified code there may be multiple versions of the map out there, but all versions will be correct and not corrupt because the map is assigned atomically. Eventually, the JVM will sort out which map is the one currently associated with that static member and any other copies will be collected as trash.

share|improve this answer

Yes, you can initialize a static member once and share it across threads, but only if you exercise due care. For example, all init() call sites must be synchronized; that is, init() may only be called from the constructor or from synchronized methods. Alternatively, you may initialize the mapOfConstants variable in a static initializer block. Whichever approach you use, you may also want to consider the java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap implementation as the concrete type for the mapOfConstants variable since this will avoid headaches later.

Failing to exercise due care may cause you to encounter the "double-checked locking" race condition. Also, initializing a static reference variable is usually considered an anti-pattern since, in this case, entries in the map can grow without bound within one activation of the program. Typically, the only acceptable usage for such a reference would be if the contents were, well, constant or if the contents grew very slowly--think logarithmically--over time. Logarithmic growth may be aided by the use of a java.util.WeakHashMap or, failing that, the judicious use of weak references.

So far, the focus seems to be on initializing the static mapOfConstants variable. But this forgets that the whole purpose of a map is (usually) to store something for later retrieval in O(1) time in the best case. Keep in mind that when store and retrieval operations (on the mapOfConstants variable) cross thread boundaries, then those operations must also be synchronized. Absent synchronization, additions or edits by one thread may be missed by other threads, which could ramify for your program's data integrity.

share|improve this answer

First of all, don't initialize the map in run() method, there's no guarantee that the initialization only happens once. Sure in this case it doesn't matter how many times you created that map, eventually one will be set to the static reference, and others be GCed. It's just not pretty. I suggest static initialization blocks:

private final static Map<String,String> mapOfConstants;
static {
    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
    // initialize map.
    map.put("", "");
    ...

    // convert the map into unmodifiable
    mapOfConstants = Collections.unmodifiableMap(map);
}

However, there's another way to share a map of constants among multiple threads. Since you are considering loading the constants from a text file, have you considered extracting the static reference from your Runnable, initialize the map elsewhere, then pass in the reference? The constructor takes an additional map reference.

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

    private final Map<String,String> mapOfConstants = null;

    private String member;

    public MyRunnable(String member, Map<String,String> mapOfConstants) {
        this.member = member;
        this.mapOfConstants = mapOfConstants;
    }
    ....
}

Then in your servlet, get the map reference from say a MapOfConstantsFactory

protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws     ServletException, IOException {
    Map<String, String> sharedMapOfConstants = MapOfConstantsFactory.getMapOfConstants();
    String myInput = request.getParameter("input");
    Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(myInput, sharedMapOfConstants));
    t.start();

    response.setContentType("text/html");
    PrintWriter out = response.getWriter();
    out.println("Process started!");
    out.close();
}

This way you can write Tests against different configurations of constants, without modifying your Runnable class.

share|improve this answer
    
Too much misinformation here. – Tim Bender Jul 2 '13 at 20:56
    
@Tim could you elaborate? So that I can make edits. – infgeoax Jul 3 '13 at 2:46
    
1. Allowing the map to be created more than once is not a problem per se, it is the fact that the map assigned statically and then populated. If a local scoped map is populated first and then assigned to the static scope, it doesn't really matter how many versions of the identical map exist (eventually the JVM will sort it out). 2. Using final is not enough to protect this map, the map needs to also be unmodifiable. 3. Synchronizing the map doesn't help here, concurrent reads are not a problem and the OP implies the map doesn't change. 4. No explanation of why last snippet is broken, also N/A – Tim Bender Jul 3 '13 at 8:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.