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I'm looking for a way to improve my File Search.

Currently i'm working with this Method:

public IEnumerable<FileInfo> FindFilesInDirectory(string dirPath, string searchName)
{
    return Directory.Exists(dirPath)
               ? Directory.GetFiles(dirPath, "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
                          .ToList()
                          .ConvertAll(x => new FileInfo(x))
                          .Where(x => x.Name.ToLower().Contains(searchName.ToLower()))
               : null;
}

Is there any faster or better way to do this?

Thanks

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FYI: returning FileInfo objects if you are only insterested in the file-names is more overhead. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 2 '13 at 10:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Nearly micro-optimization, however, you can improve readability and you could add exception handling.

You should also use EnumerateFiles(if possible) which does not need to load all into memory before it starts filtering. Also, use Equals with StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase instead of ToLower since it's more efficient and less error-prone(the Turkey test).

public IEnumerable<FileInfo> FindFilesInDirectory(string dirPath, string searchName)
{
    if (Directory.Exists(dirPath))
    {
        var dir = new DirectoryInfo(dirPath);
        return dir.EnumerateFiles("*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
                  .Where(fi => fi.Name.Equals(searchName, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase));
    }
    else
        throw new ArgumentException("Directory doesn't exist.", dirPath);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great, that's exactly what i'm looking for. BIG THANKS! –  Smartis Jul 2 '13 at 10:10
    
My pleasure! Note that this really returns just an IEnumerable<FileInfo>. So if you assign the return value to a variable you will always execute this query with methods that are not using deferred execution like Enumerable.Count. If you want to materialize this query you could add ToList(). For example: List<FileInfo> files = FindFilesInDirectory(@"D:\", "data.txt").ToList();. But you can also enumerate it without creating a new collection if you use foreach. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 2 '13 at 10:32

There's an overload that will search for a particular pattern. Instead of searching for *.* search for the filename you are interested in with the search pattern parameter.

Directory.GetFiles(dirPath, "*" + searchName + "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
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2  
"*" + searchName isn't quite the same as x.Name.ToLower().Contains(searchName.ToLower()) and represents an endsWith search rather than a contains search. –  spender Jul 2 '13 at 10:02
    
True, agreed and altered. –  Jeff Foster Jul 2 '13 at 10:05
return Directory.Exists(dirPath)
           ? Directory.EnumerateFiles(
                dirPath, 
                string.Format("*{0}*",searchName), 
                SearchOption.AllDirectories)
              .Select(x => new FileInfo(x))
           : null;
share|improve this answer
public IEnumerable<FileInfo> FindFilesInDirectory(string dirPath, string searchName)
{
    return Directory.Exists(dirPath)
               ? Directory.GetFiles(dirPath, "*" + searchName + "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
                          .Select(x => new FileInfo(x))
               : null;
}
share|improve this answer

I don't know what you're doing with your results, but I think it's worth mentioning that the execution of the query in your method will be deferred until you implement it. So depending on what you're doing with the query, it might slow down execution. If this wasn't intended, just add a .toList() to return a list for immediate execution.

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