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I am new to android development so please bear with me. I have recently been following some dialog box tutorials and realised how verbose it is to create a dialog box and display it to the user. So I have placed all the relevant dialog box code into a handy static method. See below:

public static boolean dialog(Context context, String text)
{
    boolean result = false;
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
    builder.setMessage(text);
    builder.setCancelable(false);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Yes", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()  {
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
                result = true;}
            });
    builder.setNegativeButton("No", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                result = false;}
            });
    AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
    dialog.show();
    return result;
}

However when the compiler does not like the lines result = true or result = false. It returns the error Cannot refer to a non-final variable result inside an inner class defined in a different method.

I have searched for a solution to this answer, but all the answers I have either not understood properly or they have not been a proper solution to my problem (eg, I cannot just make the variable 'final').

Any suggestions for solving this problem would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
you have to move result in the class scope –  blackbelt Jul 2 '13 at 10:19
    
Btw, your method will always return "false". Why do you want to return a boolean? –  Carnal Jul 2 '13 at 10:20
    
What makes you think it will always return false? The result = true and result = false declarations are inside their respective yes/no onClick events. I believe this is correct, have I written the code incorrectly? –  Teifi Jul 2 '13 at 10:25
    
Because you are creating a dialog and returning the result immediately. This result will only change the second time if you pressed "Yes". –  Carnal Jul 2 '13 at 10:31
    
Oh so the code does not pause at dialog.show();? Ah, I see the problem now, thanks. I am used to coding in C# and finding alot of differences. –  Teifi Jul 2 '13 at 10:33
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ken Wolf`s answer is NOT a solution. Dont you know, that dialog(...) will return result before you can touch Dialog button? Its Java basics. You need to do something in onClick, something like calling getActivity().onDialogYesButton() and getActivity().onDialogNoButton()!

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Declare result outside your method.

static boolean result = false;

public static boolean dialog(Context context, String text) {
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
    builder.setMessage(text);
    builder.setCancelable(false);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Yes", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()  {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
            result = true;
        }
    });
    builder.setNegativeButton("No", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
            result = false;
        }
    });
    AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
    dialog.show();
    return result;
}
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Perfect, thank you. I wish there was a cleaner solution! –  Teifi Jul 2 '13 at 10:21
    
There might be - can't you just execute whatever method you need in the onClicks instead of returning a boolean and using that somewhere else? –  Ken Wolf Jul 2 '13 at 10:33
    
I was hoping for a re-usable dialog method though, hence why I've tried to put my contextual logic outside of the scope of this method. I guess I could put my logic inside the scope of this method, but then I would no longer have a nice re-usable method to call when I needed a yes/no dialog box. My only known alternative is to write this horribly verbose dialog code every time I need it. –  Teifi Jul 2 '13 at 10:38
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To avoid side-effects with closures in java local variables referenced by an anonymous delegate must be marked as final. You can make that a class/static variable.

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I can't make this variable final, it needs to be modified at a later point. But making the variable a class variable has worked perfectly - albeit a bit of a messy solution. –  Teifi Jul 2 '13 at 10:23
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You can create your own callback interface somewhere

public interface DialogResult {
    void onDialogResult(boolean result);
}

then pass that down to the dialog

public static void dialog(Context context, String text, final DialogResult callback) {
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
    builder.setMessage(text);
    builder.setCancelable(false);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Yes", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()  {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
                callback.onDialogResult(true);
                }
            });
    builder.setNegativeButton("No", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                callback.onDialogResult(false);
                }
            });
    AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
    dialog.show();
}

and the dialog will at some point in the future use the callback to notify you of the result. You can't just return a result from the future.

Then simply use it like all those other callbacks

static class MyActivity extends Activity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        // ....
        Button b = (Button) findViewById(R.id.someButton);
        b.setOnClickListener(mOnClickListener);
    }

    private View.OnClickListener mOnClickListener = new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            // show dialog at some point
            dialog(v.getContext(), "Hello Dialog", mDialogCallback);
        }
    };

    private DialogResult mDialogCallback = new DialogResult() {
        @Override
        public void onDialogResult(boolean result) {
            // do something with the result
        }
    };
}
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You can't just return a result from the future. < I know that, I was just not aware how java operates. In the past I have done a lot of coding in C#, where calling a dialog box will pause the rest of the code. I have learnt now that java operates very differently :) –  Teifi Jul 2 '13 at 11:02
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A local class can only access local variables that are declared final.

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