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I am working on re-writing an existing Java software solution in .NET. At one point, the Java solution reads a time stamp at the beginning of a string, simply like this:

SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat(timeFormat);
dateFormat.setLenient(false);

try
{
    timeStamp = dateFormat.parse(line);
}
catch (ParseException e)
{
    //...
}

Now I am trying to do the same in C#:

DateTimeFormatInfo dateTimeFormatInfo = new DateTimeFormatInfo();
dateTimeFormatInfo.FullDateTimePattern = format;

try
{
    timeStamp = DateTime.Parse(line, dateTimeFormatInfo);
}
catch (FormatException ex)
{
    //...
}

Both languages work until I add some random text after the time stamp in the line variable. Java will just ignore it, but C# will not allow anything else after the time stamp text in the line.

So while Java is happy to parse "01/01/01 01:01:01,001 Hello World!" as a time stamp, C# is not, because " Hello World!" is not specified in the format string.

However, as I cannot make any statement about what might come after the time stamp inside my strings, I cannot include it in my format string.

Any ideas?

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Can you guarantee that the date format will always be the same in the file? Just take the first N characters of the line and parse that. –  Agent_9191 Nov 16 '09 at 14:21
    
I can guarantee that the date format will be the same, yes, but your solution does not take into account date formats like "May 1st, 2009". The length might vary wildly. –  Callash Nov 16 '09 at 14:24
    
Not an answer to your question, but if possible you should use DateTime.TryParse rather than try...DateTime.Parse...catch. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.tryparse.aspx –  LukeH Nov 16 '09 at 14:25
    
Are you creating the strings to be parsed? or are they given to you? –  Alastair Pitts Nov 16 '09 at 14:29
    
They are given to me. –  Callash Nov 16 '09 at 14:31

3 Answers 3

Try this:

Dictionary<string, string> tests = new Dictionary<string,string>()
{
    { "yy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss,fff", "01/01/01 01:01:01,001 Hello World!"},
    { "yyyyMMddHHmmssfff", "2009111615413829403 Hello World!"},
    { "d.M.yyyy H:m:s,fff", "8.10.2009 8:17:26,338 Hello World!" }
};

foreach(KeyValuePair<string, string> test in tests)
{
    string pattern = test.Key;
    string format = test.Value;

    DateTimeFormatInfo dateTimeFormatInfo = new DateTimeFormatInfo();
    dateTimeFormatInfo.FullDateTimePattern = pattern;

    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", pattern, format);
    DateTime timeStamp = DateTime.MinValue;
    if (pattern.Contains(' ')) // approach 1: split and conquer
    {
        format = String.Join(" ", format
            .Split(" ".ToCharArray())
            .Take(pattern.Count(c => c == ' ') + 1));
    }
    else
    {
        format = format.Substring(0, pattern.Length);
    }


    if (!DateTime.TryParseExact(
        format, pattern, dateTimeFormatInfo, 
        DateTimeStyles.AllowWhiteSpaces, out timeStamp))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("\tSomething sad happened");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("\t{0}", timeStamp.ToString(pattern));
    }
}
Console.Read();

Note I don't use DateTime.Parse, since it throws an Exception if String isn't a valid DateTime formatted string.

UPDATE 1: Better input handling, as don't expect an whitespace, but uses pattern length

UPDATE 2: Two previous approach merged into this code; I'm aware about using a single d into test #2, but I don't think we can do anything about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Getting there, but if I see it correctly, this assumes that there is always a whitespace after the time stamp. One line I might come across would look like this: "2009111615413829403" which is "yyyyMMddHHmmssfff" followed by a two-digit error code. –  Callash Nov 16 '09 at 14:42
    
Still not it, as your solution expects the time pattern and the time stamp to have the same length. My pattern could be "d.M.yyyy H:m:s,fff" (length 18), and the time stamp to parse could be "8.10.2009 8:17:26,338" (length 21). –  Callash Nov 16 '09 at 15:08
    
you're right; that pattern is always valid? –  Rubens Farias Nov 16 '09 at 15:22
    
We can assume valid patterns, yes. –  Callash Nov 16 '09 at 15:36

Looks like .Net is going to parse the whole string and you don't control the whole string. I would say use TryParse() and if it fails, strip off the right-most "word" from your string and re-try. I'm not familiar with Java but it may do this under the covers.

share|improve this answer

If you know what format your date will be in and the context with which it's stored then that's an advantage.

For instance, if you knew that you were storing yesterday's logs or something like that:

DateTime yesterday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-1);
timestamp = DateTime.Parse(
    line.SubString(0, line.IndexOf(yesterday.Year.ToString()) + 4));

edit: Is there anything delimiting the text after the date (even a space)?

If there is, you could do something like this:

private static DateTime GetDate(string line)
{
    int index = 0;
    DateTime theDate;
    string s = line;

    while(!DateTime.TryParse(s, out theDate))
    {
        index = line.IndexOf(" ", index);
        s = line.Substring(0, index);
    }

    return theDate;
}

Note: This will fail to get the time if there is text after the date (as it will be able to parse out the date without time successfully when searching). You could fix that by getting the index of spaces starting at the end of the line and moving backward. I'll leave that to you.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't, unfortunately. The time format pattern is given by configuration, but the date could be anything, yesterday, one month ago, one year ago. –  Callash Nov 16 '09 at 14:23

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