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Consider the code:

public abstract class Base
{
   public Dictionary<int, string> Entities { get; private set; }

   protected Base()
   {
      Entities = new Dictionary<int, string>();
   }
}

public abstract class A : Base
{
   public abstract void Update();
}

public abstract class B : Base
{
   public abstract void Draw();
}

Is it possible to restrict classes (in the same assembly) from inheriting from Base, forcing them to inherit from either A or B?

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7  
No. Then how would A and B inherit? –  Grant Thomas Jul 2 '13 at 12:49
    
You mean, you want A and B to inherit Base, but no other classes? –  crush Jul 2 '13 at 12:49
    
@crush yes, precisely that. It's not of real importance but I was interested to know if it was possible. –  Steve Jul 2 '13 at 12:51
    
make the Base class constructor as private and add the class A and B as inner class inside the base –  user2511414 Jul 2 '13 at 15:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To elaborate a little on my comment. This isn't supported, so the answer is no. The only contrived way of trying this that comes to mind (that obviously wouldn't work) would be to have a sealed abstract class, which is nonsensical, as neither A nor B, nor anything else, could then inherit either.

There is no discriminator that allows us to say, "sealed for", for instance.

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Much appreciated, and as your comment was first I'll accept your answer, thank you. –  Steve Jul 2 '13 at 12:57

The only way to prevent an inheritance is declare class like sealed.

public sealed abstract class A
{
}

but you will get compile error:

Abstract class can not be declared sealed.

The reason for this is that simply no any meaning in decalring abstract class and limiting its inheritance tree. Abstact class is an entity that targets to be expanded by someone by its definition.

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I experimented with sealed and got the error you described and expected as much. Thanks for the insight. –  Steve Jul 2 '13 at 12:56

The closest thing you can do, as far as I know, is the following:

public abstract class Base
{
   internal Base()
   {
      // do stuff
   }
}

Then move A, B, and Base into their own assembly. Anything outside the assembly can see Base, but cannot extend it directly because it can't access the constructor.

Or you could do a runtime check:

public abstract class Base
{
   protected Base()
   {
      if (!(this is A || this is B))
         // throw an exception
   }
}
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Thanks for the other options. –  Steve Jul 2 '13 at 13:04
    
The second option really doesn't look like a nice way to code. Although suitable to the task at hand. –  zaitsman Jul 2 '13 at 13:08
    
@zaitsman I agree. I probably should've included a disclaimer about how bad it is to do something like that. –  Tim S. Jul 2 '13 at 14:42

The only way round this that I can think of would be to have something like:

A.dll

internal abstract class Base
{
   public Dictionary<int, string> Entities { get; private set; }

   protected Base()
   {
      Entities = new Dictionary<int, string>();
   }
}

B.dll

public abstract class A : Base
{
   public abstract void Update();
}

public abstract class B : Base
{
   public abstract void Draw();
}

C.dll

public class C : A
{
    public void Draw()
    {
    }
}

and then to use [assembly: InternalsVisibleTo...] in the AssemblyInfo.cs of A.dll to make internal classes visible to B.ll.

Disclaimer: It's quite convoluted and I wouldn't recommend it, but I couldn't think of any way to satisfy your constraints.

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