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I've got this piece of code that calculates both the MD5 and SHA1 value of a given file and presents it in the console. It does its job, however i get the error message:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "C:\Program Files (x86)\Aptana\workspace\Ipfit5\Semi-Definitief\test6.py",
line 64, in <module>
hash_file(woord)
File "C:\Program Files (x86)\Aptana\workspace\Ipfit5\Semi-Definitief\test6.py",
line 29, in hash_file
hash_file(sys.argv[1]);
IndexError: list index out of range

the code looks as following:

import sys, hashlib, os

def hash_file(filename):    #Calculate MD5 and SHA1 hash values of a given file

 # Create hash objects for MD5 and SHA1.
 md5_hash = hashlib.md5()
 sha1_hash = hashlib.sha1()
 filename = r"C:/this.png"

 # Read the given file by 2K blocks. Feed blocks
 # into into the hash objects by "update(data)" method.
 fp = open(filename,'rb')
 while 1:
     data = fp.read(2048)
     if not data:
         break
     else:
         md5_hash.update(data)
         sha1_hash.update(data)
         fp.close()
         print "The MD5  hash of your file is" 
         print filename,":", md5_hash.hexdigest();
         print "The SHA1 hash of your file is" 
         print filename,":", sha1_hash.hexdigest();
         if __name__ == '__main__':
             hash_file(sys.argv[1]);

hash_file(woord)

I call the function for (woord) because that is something defined later on in the script, but it is basically the same image as filename in the function hash_file(filename).

Why do i get this error when it does show me both the hash values and how do i get rid of it ?

EDIT: I know it has somethin to do with the if name == 'main': hash_file(sys.argv[1]); but i can't figure it out.

Any help is greatly appreciated

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

When running the file, you have to give an extra argument:

$ python myfile.py argument

If you print sys.argv, you will get something like:

['myfile.py`]

But once adding an extra argument, you can get something like:

['myfile.py', 'argument']

And that is what the [1] accesses.

As you know the code more than me, you'll have to figure out what the script is expecting as an argument.

share|improve this answer
    
im running from inside aptana studio 3 so it just prompt's me some inputs and works with that, then it will calculate the value of the hash. So i can't really give an extra argument, or am i wrong ? –  Nick Jul 2 '13 at 13:01
    
@Nick Sorry, I'm not able to help you there :(. You'll have to find another way to run your script (maybe) so you can add extra info. Sorry once again –  Haidro Jul 2 '13 at 13:02
    
okay, thanks anyway! –  Nick Jul 2 '13 at 13:04

There is something wrong with that piece of code, the "if name == 'main':" statement, means that the code inside the "if" only work when the python code is executed and not when it is used as a module. But inside the "if", a recursive call: hash_file(sys.argv[1]) is used, it means that the code needs an argument, but it will start a infinite recursive loop.

I think that the code:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    hash_file(sys.argv[1]);

goes outside the hash_file() function

I think this will work as you want:

import sys, hashlib, os

def hash_file(filename):    #Calculate MD5 and SHA1 hash values of a given file

# Create hash objects for MD5 and SHA1.
md5_hash = hashlib.md5()
sha1_hash = hashlib.sha1()
filename = r"C:/this.png"

# Read the given file by 2K blocks. Feed blocks
# into into the hash objects by "update(data)" method.
fp = open(filename,'rb')
while 1:
    data = fp.read(2048)
    if not data:
        break
    else:
        md5_hash.update(data)
        sha1_hash.update(data)
fp.close()
print "The MD5  hash of your file is" 
print filename,":", md5_hash.hexdigest();
print "The SHA1 hash of your file is" 
print filename,":", sha1_hash.hexdigest();

# other code here

if __name__ == '__main__':
 #hash_file(sys.argv[1]);
 hash_file(woord)
share|improve this answer
    
That is indeed true, but when i place that piece of code outside the hash_file() function, the script won't do anything anymore. It just gives the error hash_file(sys.argv[1]); IndexError: list index out of range –  Nick Jul 2 '13 at 13:44
    
This doesn't seem to fix my problem because it want's some sort of input from if name == 'main': Do you suppose there is a way of completely removing that code? I have seen that the only reason that one would use that is so that it can be used as an import for other modules but i don't need that –  Nick Jul 2 '13 at 13:49
    
if you not going to call the scrpt with an argument, you need to remove the sys.argv[1] call, replace it with hash_file(woord) –  Cesar Jul 2 '13 at 13:55
    
Keep in mind that in the hash_file() function you are redefining the parameter "filename", so "woord" will not be take in count –  Cesar Jul 2 '13 at 13:55
    
It does somehow seem to work, but now i get a different error on the data = fp.read(2048). data = fp.read(2048) ValueError: I/O operation on closed file I am just not getting what is going wrong since it is not such a complicated script –  Nick Jul 2 '13 at 13:55

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