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I'm just doing codeschool and they told me:

SORRY, TRY AGAIN transform must be defined last, after the browser prefix styles.

and here is my code:

img:hover {
  -webkit-transform: translate(10px,20px);
  -o-transform: translate(10px,20px);
    transform: translate(10px,20px);
  -moz-transform: translate(10px,20px);
}

As I always do I start to playing with my code and discover that I don't need this line of code:

  transform: translate(10px,20px);

at all! Everything is working without it! Then I tried to delete all these stuff

   -webkit-transform: translate(10px,20px);
  -o-transform: translate(10px,20px);
  -moz-transform: translate(10px,20px);

and leave

    transform: translate(10px,20px);

only. What a surprise! it doesn't work! So here is my first question:

Why do I have to define line transform: translate(10px,20px); without -o-/-webkit-/-moz- if it doesn't work at all?

and than second: WHy codeschool tells that

SORRY, TRY AGAIN transform must be defined last, after the browser prefix styles.

Why?

share|improve this question
1  
It doesn't have to be last, but if it is, you ensure that the final (non-prefixed) version will be in effect if supported. If you google for "css vendor prefix" you should get some decent information. –  xec Jul 2 '13 at 14:01
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about CSS best practices (possibly may be more appropriate for another SE site). –  cimmanon Jul 2 '13 at 14:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

CodeSchool is forcing you to use a CSS best practice. This one is has a good reason: future-proofing. Why/how?

CSS3 isn't quite standard yet, but that hasn't stopped the people at Google or Mozilla from trying to implement the features. Problem is, since CSS3 is changing, those guys aren't quite sure how it works. To get around this, the non-standard prefix notation (-moz- or -o- rules) were created as transitional rules to use while the CSS3 spec is slowly finalized.

But this created a new problem: "what to do with these rules once CSS3 is finalized?" That is what the 'Cascade' in CSS is for: rules lower-down take priority over those higher up. By adding the 'standard' rule below the extension ones, it will override the browser-specific ones only when the browser supports it.

Thus, we can use features bleeding-edge browsers today, while being ready for the standards tomorrow, and do it with the same CSS file!

share|improve this answer

the -o-/-moz- etc.. are browser specific declarations which are in place to allow browsers that don't support the native property but have their own implementation.

You should always have the regular property without the prefix. Prefixes are only their to extend the range of browsers that will apply the property.

The specific order of the properties will have no effect on the page output, however depending on how strict a validator is it may tell you that it's not valid unless the unprefixed property is written last

share|improve this answer
    
The specific order of the properties definitely does have an effect on the page output. Properties that are mentioned further down will take precedence over ones mentioned earlier, and in the case a browser supports both a vendor prefix and a non-vendor prefixed version the later of the two will be the one that takes effect. The difference is subtle, but important when you start running across properties that have changed their implementations over time. –  Robert McKee Jul 2 '13 at 18:08
    
I'm only talking about the order when it comes to prefixed properties in the same class. Can you name even one property where if you place the vendor prefixed property after the non-vendor prefixed property you see a different output on the page compared to the correct way round? –  Novocaine Jul 3 '13 at 8:02
    
Sure, for example, width: 180px; width: -webkit-calc(100% - 10px) will behave differently from width: -webkit-calc(100% - 10px); width: 180px. For vendor prefixed properties, border-radius and box-shadow come to mind. Look at jsfiddle.net/tdg8Q/1 and jsfiddle.net/tdg8Q in chrome (I assume safari as well) and see the difference. Box shadow has (or will have) similar issues because of the difference in blurring between the proprietary version and the standards version. –  Robert McKee Jul 3 '13 at 16:26
    
The difference is if you place the vendor prefix first, you are saying, use the vendor specific implementation, but if it also supports the standard way, do that instead. Where if you put the standard way first, you are saying do it the standard way, but if you also support the vendor specific version do that instead. You use the former way when you want all browsers to behave the same way, and you use the later when the vendor provides an even better way than the standard and you would prefer it. There are a handful of properties like that now, and there will likely be many more coming –  Robert McKee Jul 3 '13 at 16:37
    
I completely understand that the last rule will be the one that takes precedence if it's supported. I was however unaware that there were any browser specific implementations that differed in output to the standard version. I guess I was wrong. I shall eat my words. –  Novocaine Jul 4 '13 at 8:29

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