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Given the right code it's relatively trivial to write secure java program that (unless a specific exploitation is targeted) cant leave the sandbox or do potentially dangerous things.

However, my question stems from the inverse of this. What sort of access does a root user have to information within a JVM? Are there any safeguards that I can put into place to limit or remove what a root user can see/modify? And lastly, does anyone know of any good resources with which to get myself up to spec with this? It seems to be a terribly hard topic to google...

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closed as off-topic by Nambari, Luiggi Mendoza, Burkhard, Mark, alexisdm Jul 2 '13 at 15:24

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Simple answer: You cannot prevent this. A root can do anything (as long as you do no countermeasures like SELinux). This is independent of Java. –  Uwe Plonus Jul 2 '13 at 14:30
    
SELinux does not worth it, too much hasle for the job. Unless you are in a finantial institution and you are in the security department. –  David Hofmann Jul 2 '13 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This question reminds me of when someone asks "is there a way to encrypt the username and password in my config files?".

The point is, if a user already has root access to your server, you have bigger things to worry about than them querying a running JVM.

For instance, say your application has a hibernate.cfg.xml they can quickly see the credentials to your database. There's worse things they can do when they have server access if they were malicious.

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Thank you, I was afraid to hear this answer. Fortunately for me it's not that I'm worried that someone has access to my server - just that someone has access to the code that I have executing on their machine (which was permitted to run there). –  cscan Jul 2 '13 at 14:58
    
Ah - that's a different question, if you were really concerned about that, you could consider obfustication (which, bare in mind isn't secure, it's just another level of complexity). Consider secureteam.net/Java-Obfuscator-Features.aspx but make sure they don't alter the flow of your code. –  david99world Jul 2 '13 at 15:05

Root can do anything, but you should not use root in the first place. Mostly people use root to be able to bind to ports lower thatn 1000, like 80 or 443 for http(s) servers.

You can workaround that instead of running your jvm as root.

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Fortunately for me it's not that I'm worried that someone has access to my server - just that someone has access to the code that I have executing on their machine (which was permitted to run there)

If they control the system (e.g. they have root access) they can read your JVM's address space, and (given the time and skills) recover any information / secrets embedded in either your code or the data.

There is no truly effective solution. (Things like obfuscation are only "speed bumps" for a skilled hacker.) If you can't trust the people with root access, you shouldn't run code containing secrets on their machines.

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