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I am now using YAML to store the data and it works in creating and storing the file. I am still trying to figure out how to get the table to print to the terminal in the correct format using the text-table gem. Here is the code:

def highscore
if File.exists?('highscore.txt')
    hs = YAML.load_file("highscore.txt")
else
    hs = {
        1 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        2 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        3 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        4 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        5 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        6 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        7 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        8 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        9 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        10 => { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
        }
end

(1..10).each do |rank|
  t = Time.now
  if @grand_total > hs[rank][:score]
    hs[rank][:score] = @grand_total
    hs[rank][:date] = "#{t.month}/#{t.day}/#{t.year}" 
    puts "Congratulations you set a new HIGH SCORE! Enter your initials."
    initials = gets.chomp.upcase
    hs[rank][:player] = initials
    break
  else
    puts "Sorry, you didn't get a high score. Try again!"
  end
end

File.write('highscore.txt', hs.to_yaml)

puts hs.to_table

end

share|improve this question
1  
I don't see any place in your code where you tried to save, or showed where you want to save. –  the Tin Man Jul 2 '13 at 15:02
    
The code I have above doesn't save the high score table besides for the current session. I was asking what the best way of saving it to a file, and then reading it back in every time a new session begins would be, this way a single user or multiple users on a single computer could keep track of their best scores. –  evkline Jul 2 '13 at 15:15
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1 Answer

I'd recommend you look into using the YAML data serializer. It creates a nicely formatted and readable file that is easily read by other languages.

require 'pp'
require 'yaml'

hs = [["RANK", "PLAYER", "SCORE", "DATE"],
      ["1st", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["2nd", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["3rd", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["4th", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["5th", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["6th", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["7th", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["8th", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["9th", "-", 0, "-"],
      ["10th", "-", 0, "-"]]

puts hs.to_yaml

Which looks like:

---
- - RANK
  - PLAYER
  - SCORE
  - DATE
- - 1st
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 2nd
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 3rd
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 4th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 5th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 6th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 7th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 8th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 9th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'
- - 10th
  - '-'
  - 0
  - '-'

Saving to file is easy:

File.write('path/to/file.yaml', hs.to_yaml)

And reading it back in is as easy:

hs = YAML.load_file('path/to/file.yaml')

Read through the "Yaml Cookbook" for more information how Ruby and YAML structures are related.

That said, I'd recommend a different data structure for your high score table. Instead of arrays of arrays, which are a pain to access, use a hash of hashes:

hs = {
  1 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  2 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  3 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  4 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  5 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  6 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  7 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  8 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  9 =>  { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
  10 => { player: '', score: 0, date: '' },
}

This will make the YAML file easier to understand:

---
1:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
2:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
3:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
4:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
5:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
6:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
7:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
8:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
9:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''
10:
  :player: ''
  :score: 0
  :date: ''

And will simplify your accesses to the table in your code.

In general, your code needs a major clean up. A very strong principle in writing code is "DRY" AKA "Don't repeat yourself". You have a huge amount of redundancy in your code, that can be simplified greatly. That needs to be handled in a separate question, but, basically your score-handling code could be reduced to a case statement and a method to store values in the hash.

share|improve this answer
    
Great Lesson. :) It seems I am newly introduced to yaml,although I had already.. :)) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 2 '13 at 15:08
    
Thanks, I will check this code and the book out! –  evkline Jul 2 '13 at 15:15
    
Tin Man, just 1 quick question. I was printing the high score table to the terminal for the user to see after a game is over. Would I be able to use YAML to save the data and then still print it back out with the text-table gem? –  evkline Jul 2 '13 at 16:02
    
Why wouldn't you? Try writing some test code to see. –  the Tin Man Jul 2 '13 at 16:35
    
I am getting an error, I am trying to replace the "score: 0" with "@grand_total" and this is what I'm receiving... ArgumentError: comparison of Fixnum with nil failed from yahtzee_highscore.rb:29:in `>' –  evkline Jul 2 '13 at 16:38
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