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I am trying to solve the following problem: Numbers are being inserted into a container. Each time a number is inserted I need to know how many elements are in the container that are greater than or equal to the current number being inserted. I believe both operations can be done in logarithmic complexity.

My question: Are there standard containers in a C++ library that can solve the problem? I know that std::multiset can insert elements in logarithmic time, but how can you query it? Or should I implement a data structure (e.x. a binary search tree) to solve it?

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I think a red-black tree in which every node stores the size of its subtree would work. But there may be an easier way. –  aschepler Jul 2 '13 at 15:03
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Perhaps a variant of an insertion sort, which counts as it goes. –  lurker Jul 2 '13 at 15:03
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@Vlad For set iterators, std::distance is O(N). –  aschepler Jul 2 '13 at 15:11
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@Vlad: only by storing the size of subtrees in each node, and the standard doesn't require that. –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '13 at 15:15
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I do not think there is anything in STL which would suit your needs (provided you MUST have logarithmic times). I think the best solution then, as @aschepler says, is to implement a RB tree. You may have a look at STL source code, particularly on stl_tree.h to see whether you could use it as a template (I mean informal template, not C++ template :) –  ondav Jul 2 '13 at 15:31
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Great question. I do not think there is anything in STL which would suit your needs (provided you MUST have logarithmic times). I think the best solution then, as aschepler says in comments, is to implement a RB tree. You may have a look at STL source code, particularly on stl_tree.h to see whether you could use bits of it.

Better still, look at : (Rank Tree in C++)

Which contains link to implementation:

(http://code.google.com/p/options/downloads/list)

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honestly if you need such an implementation, your n must be huge, as well as the data size needed for comparison (or you would use a vector and your own insertion). If n is huge and the data too, this is more a database problem than a C++ problem... –  lip Jul 2 '13 at 16:26
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You should use a multiset for logarithmic complexity, yes. But computing the distance is the problem, as set/map iterators are Bidirectional, not RandomAccess, std::distance has an O(n) complexity on them:

multiset<int> my_set;
...
auto it = my_map.lower_bound(3);
size_t count_inserted = distance(it, my_set.end()) // this is definitely O(n)
my_map.insert(make_pair(3);

Your complexity-issue is complicated. Here is a full analysis:

If you want a O(log(n)) complexity for each insertion, you need a sorted structure as a set. If you want the structure to not reallocate or move items when adding a new item, the insertion point distance computation will be O(n). If know the insertion size in advance, you do not need logarithmic insertion time in a sorted container. You can insert all the items then sort, it is as much O(n.log(n)) as n * O(log(n)) insertions in a set. The only alternative is to use a dedicated container like a weighted RB-tree. Depending on your problem this may be the solution, or something really overkill.

  • Use multiset and distance, you are O(n.log(n)) on insertion (yes, n insertions * log(n) insertion time for each one of them), O(n.n) on distance computation, but computing distances is very fast.
  • If you know the inserted data size (n) in advance : Use a vector, fill it, sort it, return your distances, you are O(n.log(n)), and it is easy to code.
  • If you do not know n in advance, your n is likely huge, each item is memory-heavy so you can not have O(n.log(n)) reallocation : then you have time to re-encode or re-use some non-standard code, you really have to meet these complexity expectations, use a dedicated container. Also consider using a database, you will probably have issues maintaining this in memory.
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you should use upper_bound instead of lower_bound. lower_bound + distance would give you the number of elements greater than or equal. The question was asked to give the number of elements greater than the search value. –  Nathan Ernst Jul 2 '13 at 16:25
    
@NathanErnst: the question says, "I need to know how many elements are in the container that are greater than or equal to the current number being inserted" (my emphasis). –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '13 at 16:27
    
@lip: I think some of your analyses are off. Inserting into an ordered vector isn't expected O(log n) per insertion, it's only expected O(n) per insertion. However, reallocating is average O(1), not average O(log n). The reason is that there are O(log n) allocations required when doing n insertions, but their sizes are in a geometric progression, whose sum is O(n). This bound is guaranteed. –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '13 at 16:32
    
Thx @SteveJessop you're right, I'll remove the vector example altogether, it just does not match other ideas –  lip Jul 2 '13 at 17:11
    
@SteveJessop, the author contradicts theirself between the subject and the actual question. I was referring to the subject. –  Nathan Ernst Jul 3 '13 at 1:12
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Sounds like a case for count_if - although I admit this doesn't solve it at logarithmic complexity, that would require a sorted type.

vector<int> v = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
int some_value = 3;

int count = count_if(v.begin(), v.end(), [some_value](int n) { return n > some_value; } ); 

Edit done to fix syntactic problems with lambda function

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this isn't going to be logarithmic even with set as a container, right? –  Vlad Jul 2 '13 at 15:03
    
Ah, good point. –  Mats Petersson Jul 2 '13 at 15:08
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