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So I'm creating a basic cms application to try and learn PDO a bit more in depth, but I seem to have stumbled upon an issue. I want to be able to use a function to insert data into a MySQL database, and so far I've got this code...

    public function insert($table, $rows, $values) {

        $data = $values;

        $STH = $this->DBH->("INSERT INTO `" . $table . "` (". $rows . ") values (?, ?, ?)");

    }

Do the question marks for the values represent the number of pieces of data I will be entering into the database? If so how can I know the amount of pieces of data that are going to be entered based upon the $data array? (All $values will be entered with the format 'value, value2, value3' and so on)

Hopefully I've made myself clear on what I'm asking, I'm pretty bad at explaining myself haha.. Thanks.

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Yes you need to know what you are inserting...it's not magical. –  Dany Caissy Jul 2 '13 at 15:09
    
What @DanyCaissy said. Also, the things you call $rows in your codesample are not rows but columns or fields, maybe that this is the origin of your confusion? –  fvu Jul 2 '13 at 15:13
    
it'd be helpful to see what's in $rows, but unless that comes out to be something like foo,bar,baz you're probably generating invalid SQL. your field count has to match the values count (e.g. if $rows is 4 fields, then specifying 3 placeholders for the values is a syntax error). –  Marc B Jul 2 '13 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do a prepared statement with a random number of values, as long as your values are an array. Example (untested):

public function insert($table, $rows, $values) {
  $params = rtrim(", ", str_repeat("?, ", count($values)));
  try {
    $stmt = $this->DBH->prepare("INSERT INTO $table ($rows) VALUES ($params)");
    for($i = 1; $i <= count($values); $i++) {
      $stmt->bindValue($i, $values[$i-1]);
    }
    $stmt->execute();
    return $stmt->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
  } catch(PDOException $e) {
    echo "Oops... {$e->getMessage()}";
  }
}

Edit Passing only two parameters ($table and $data as an associative array), you could do something like this (untested):

public function insert($table, $data) {
  $keys = array_keys($data);
  $values = array_values($data);
  $params = rtrim(", ", str_repeat("?, ", count($values)));
  try {
    $stmt = $this->DBH->prepare("INSERT INTO $table (`".implode("`,`", $keys)."`) VALUES ($params)");
    $stmt->execute($values);
    return $stmt->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
  } catch(PDOException $e) {
    echo "Oops... {$e->getMessage()}";
  }
}
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As long as your $data variable is an array, you can just pass it to the execute method in the PDO::Statement after it's been prepared. When question marks are used for binding it just requires a non-associative array of values in the order that you want them bound (in the order your question marks appear in the query)

public function insert($table, $rows, $values) {
    $data = $values;
    $STH = $this->DBH->prepare("INSERT INTO `" . $table . "` (". $rows . ") values (?, ?, ?)");
    $STH->execute($data);
}

You can also use names for binding:

public function insert($table, $rows, $values) {
    $data = array(":col1" => $values[0], ":col2" => $values[1], ":col3" => $values[2]);
    $STH = $this->DBH->prepare("INSERT INTO `" . $table . "` (". $rows . ") values (:col1, :col2, :col3)");
    $STH->execute($data);
}
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