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I have a small problem. I have a dataset with 8208 rows of data. It's a single column of data, I want to take every n rows as a block and add this to a new data frame.

So, for example:

newdf has column 1 to column 23.

column 1 is composed of rows 289:528 from the original dataset column 2 is composed of rows 625:864 from the original dataset

And so on. The "block" size is 239 rows, the jump between blocks is every 336 rows.

I can do this manually, but it just becomes tedious. I have to repeat this entire procedure for another 11 sets of data so obviously a more automated approach would be preferable.

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1  
The block size is not 239 if the blocks are as you state - the length is 240! –  Gavin Simpson Jul 2 '13 at 15:40

4 Answers 4

The trick here is to create an index of integers that refer to the row numbers you want to keep. This is simple enough with some use of rep, sequences and R's recycling rule.

Let me demonstrate using iris. Say you want to skip 25 rows, then return 3 rows:

skip <- 25
take <- 3

total <- nrow(iris)
reps <- total %/% (skip + take)
index <- rep(0:(reps-1), each=take) * (skip + take) + (1:take) + skip

The index now is:

index
 [1]  26  27  28  54  55  56  82  83  84 110 111 112 138 139 140

And the rows of iris:

iris[index, ]
    Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width    Species
26           5.0         3.0          1.6         0.2     setosa
27           5.0         3.4          1.6         0.4     setosa
28           5.2         3.5          1.5         0.2     setosa
54           5.5         2.3          4.0         1.3 versicolor
55           6.5         2.8          4.6         1.5 versicolor
56           5.7         2.8          4.5         1.3 versicolor
82           5.5         2.4          3.7         1.0 versicolor
83           5.8         2.7          3.9         1.2 versicolor
84           6.0         2.7          5.1         1.6 versicolor
110          7.2         3.6          6.1         2.5  virginica
111          6.5         3.2          5.1         2.0  virginica
112          6.4         2.7          5.3         1.9  virginica
138          6.4         3.1          5.5         1.8  virginica
139          6.0         3.0          4.8         1.8  virginica
140          6.9         3.1          5.4         2.1  virginica
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+1 for doing this using vectorised operators. My brain couldn't handle that this early in the morning (for me, and after Canada Day) –  Gavin Simpson Jul 2 '13 at 15:46
    
I think DWin's method of creating the indices is a bit more intuitive. –  Carl Witthoft Jul 2 '13 at 18:38

Update

Note the OP states the block size is 239 elements but it is clear from the examples rows indicated that the block size is 240

> length(289:528)
[1] 240

I'll leave the example below at a block length of 239, but adjust if it is really 240.


It isn't clear from the Question, but assuming that you have something like this

df <- data.frame(A = runif(8208))

a data frame with 8208 rows.

First compute the indices of the elements of A that you need to keep. This is done via

want <- sapply(seq(289, nrow(df)-239, by = 336),
               function(x) x + (seq_len(239) - 1))

Then we can use the fact that R fills matrices by columns and convert the required elements of A to a matrix with 239 rows

mat <- matrix(df$A[want], nrow = 239)

This works

> all.equal(mat[,1], df$A[289:527])
[1] TRUE

but do note that I have taken a block length of 239 here (289:527) not the indices the OP quotes as that is a block size of 240 (see Update above)

If you want this is a data frame, just add

df2 <- as.data.frame(mat)
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+1 Neat. I had a similar idea, implemented without sapply. –  Andrie Jul 2 '13 at 15:37
    
Good call on using matrix to coerce columns –  Señor O Jul 2 '13 at 15:38
    
Ah excellent, sorry for the confusion in row numbering, but I'll try this approach and let you know! Thanks. –  Michael Hanley Jul 2 '13 at 15:43

Try this:

1) Create a list of indices

lapply(seq(1, 8208, 336), function(X) X:(X+239)) -> Indices

2) Select Data

Columns <- lapply(Indices, function(X) OldDF[X,])

3) Combine selected data in columns

NewDF <- do.call(cbind, Columns)
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Why not just:

 as.dataframe(matrix(orig, nrow=528 )[289:528 ,])

Since the 8028 is not an exactl multiple of the row count we need to determine the columns:

> 8208/528
[1] 15.54545 # so either 15 or 16
> 8208-15*528
[1] 288  # all in the to-be-discarded section

as.dataframe(matrix(orig, nrow=528, col=15 )[289:528 ,])

Or:

as.dataframe(matrix(orig, nrow=528, col=8208 %/% 528)[289:528 ,])
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1  
To clarify for the mystified: this approach first reorganizes into a matrix whose columns have length = keep + skip , then trims off the unwanted rows (the skips) –  Carl Witthoft Jul 2 '13 at 18:39
    
(I think visually, so folding into a matrix and keeping only the bottom portion seemed pretty straightforward.) –  BondedDust Jul 2 '13 at 18:42

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