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Ok, guys, so I'm implementing a class Matrix (like a matrix in linear algebra) and I'm encountering a weird problem with a particular case when an exception is thrown. When the user is asked to input the matrix data from the console the program crashes if the !first! input is something that triggers an exception throw from the class. I presume it must be some sort of weird memory leak that I just can't seem to trace.

The only private members of the class are: double** rows / int width / int height. I'll just show you my class destructor, the input function that causes the problem, and my main function:

~Matrix()

Matrix::~Matrix()
{
    if (rows)
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < height; k++)
        {
            delete[] rows[k];
        }
        delete[] rows;
        rows = 0;
    }
}

operator>> overload

std::istream& operator>> (std::istream& in, Matrix &obj)
{
    if (obj.rows)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < obj.height; i++)
        {
            delete[] obj.rows[i];
        }
        delete[] obj.rows;
        obj.rows = 0;
        obj.width = 0;
        obj.height = 0;
    }
    std::cout << "Input matrix data (enter 'q' to stop and 'n' to start new row):" << std::endl;
    std::string input = "";
    double data;
    obj.height = 1;
    obj.rows = new double* [obj.height];
    int temp_width = 0;                                  // can overflow for incredibily long rows ;Ds
    double* temp_row = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        std::cin >> input;
        std::istringstream inputStream(input);
        //fill current row
        if (inputStream >> data)
        {
            temp_width++;
            if (temp_width > obj.width)
            {
                obj.width = temp_width;
            }
            if (temp_width == 1)
            {
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1] = new double[temp_width];
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1][temp_width - 1] = data;
            }
            else //(temp_width > 1)
            {
                //store row without the new element
                temp_row = new double [temp_width - 1];
                for (int j = 0; j < temp_width - 1; j++)
                {
                    temp_row[j] = obj.rows[obj.height - 1][j];
                }
                //temp_row = obj.rows[obj.height - 1];
                delete[] obj.rows[obj.height - 1];
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1] = 0;   //probably not needed
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1] = new double[temp_width];

                //copy over the row from previous iteration
                for (int k = 0; k < temp_width - 1; k++)
                {
                    obj.rows[obj.height - 1][k] = temp_row[k];
                }
                //append the new element at the end of current row
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1][temp_width - 1] = data;
                delete[] temp_row;
                temp_row = 0;
            }
        }
        //add new row
        else if (input == "n")
        {
            //prevent creating new row if the current one is empty
            if (temp_width == 0)
            {
                throw InputError("You must enter at least one element per row.");
            }
            //stuff end of row with zeroes if needed
            else if (temp_width < obj.width)
            {
                temp_row = new double [temp_width];
                temp_row = obj.rows[obj.height - 1];
                delete[] obj.rows[obj.height - 1];
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1] = new double[obj.width];
                for (int i = 0; i < obj.width; i++)
                {
                    if (i > temp_width - 1)
                        obj.rows[obj.height - 1][i] = 0;
                    else
                        obj.rows[obj.height - 1][i] = temp_row[i];
                }
                delete[] temp_row;
                temp_row = 0;
            }
            //backup current matrix AND delete the original
            double** temp_matrix = new double* [obj.height];
            for (int k = 0; k < obj.height; k++)
            {
                temp_matrix[k] = new double [obj.width];
                for (int j = 0; j < obj.width; j++)
                {
                    temp_matrix[k][j] = obj.rows[k][j];
                }
                delete[] obj.rows[k];
            }
            delete[] obj.rows;
            obj.rows = 0;
            //generate the new bigger matrix, copy backup into it, delete backup
            obj.height++;
            obj.rows = new double* [obj.height];
            for (int s = 0; s < obj.height - 1; s++)
            {
                obj.rows[s] = new double [obj.width];
                for (int v = 0; v < obj.width; v++)
                {
                    obj.rows[s][v] = temp_matrix[s][v];
                }
                delete[] temp_matrix[s];
            }
            delete[] temp_matrix;
            temp_matrix = 0;
            temp_width = 0;
        }
        //exit input
        else if (input == "q")
        {
            if (obj.width == 0)
            {
                throw InputError("Input Error. You must enter at least one element into matrix");
            }
            //stuff with zeroes if needed
            if (temp_width < obj.width)
            {
                temp_row = new double [temp_width];
                temp_row = obj.rows[obj.height - 1];
                delete[] obj.rows[obj.height - 1];
                obj.rows[obj.height - 1] = new double[obj.width];
                for (int i = 0; i < obj.width; i++)
                {
                    if (i > temp_width - 1)
                        obj.rows[obj.height - 1][i] = 0;
                    else
                        obj.rows[obj.height - 1][i] = temp_row[i];
                }
            }
            break;
        }
        //throw input error
        else
        {
            throw InputError("Input Error. Only numbers and the characters 'n' and 'q' are accepted");
        }
    }
    return in;
}

main()

int main()
{
    bool tryAgain = true;
    Matrix m1;
    while (tryAgain)
    {
        try
        {
            cin >> m1;
            cout << "Matrix 1: \n" << m1;
        }
        catch (InputError& e)
        {
            cout << e.what() << endl;
        }
        cout << "Enter matrix data again? (y/n) ";
        char input;
        cin >> input;
        if (input == 'n') tryAgain = false;
    }
    return 0;
}

If you find it too troublesome to thoroughly look through my operator>> function just take the simplest case in which the program will crush. That is when the user's first input is something other than a number or one of the characters 'q' and 'n'. This is handled by the last else-statement in the operator>> function. The exact result is that in the console you see the thrown exception and then the while-loop from the main() function continues. When it loops back to the cin >> m1; statement the second time no matter the input you just get a message - "This application has requested the Runtime to terminate it...". Sometimes you don't even have to input anything the second time and it crashes before that. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
your code does not look like a class at all, just a decorated pointer. op>> should just read the stream and use the class' functions to put the numbers where due. And you should not use new and delete either, just a vector<double> or maybe vector<vector<double>> if you support uneven rows – Balog Pal Jul 2 '13 at 15:42
1  
@Balog Pal, good suggestion to migrate to std::vector but I cry every time I come across a jagged-edge matrix implementation. – Bathsheba Jul 2 '13 at 15:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use vectors. They manage their own memory, test for overflows and easily allow you to add new elements. In this case, you need a vector of vectors to represent the 2d array. I couldn't be bothered to wrap it in a class for you, but here is the basic idea.

vector< vector< double > > data;
// height
data.resize(10);
// width
for (vector< vector< double > >::iterator it = data.begin(), end_it = data.end(); it != end_it; ++it)
{
    it->resize(5);
}

// access element, notice X/Y reversed (it's more efficient this way)
int x = 3;
int y = 4;
double d = data[y][x];

// add extra element to row
data[y].push_back(d);
share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by "more efficient"? data[y][x] and data[x][y] are different elements in the 2d vector, or am i missing somethin? – broda Jul 3 '13 at 11:17
    
Usually when iterating through a 2d array, people go along the row (x) first, and then along the column (y) next. If the size of the row vectors is large, it is more cache efficient to make accesses to the same vector "in a row" (pardon the pun) and then move onto the next one.. than it is to alternate between all the row vectors, accessing only one element from each at a time. This is what would happen if the y vector is on the "outside". When iterating column first, then row, the opposite is more efficient. – Neil Kirk Jul 4 '13 at 19:49

The problems you are encountering are down to your memory management choice, which I think is fundamentally incorrect as you are not modelling a matrix but a jagged-edged structure with a whole load of non-contiguous memory. (Writing, for example, a transpose method would be a nightmare with your design choice.)

Two routes from here:

1) Redesign your class with a single block of memory; suggest that (zero-based) element (i, j) is held at i * rows + j where rows is the number of rows in the matrix. You could replace [][] with calls to overloaded operators of the form double& operator()(unsigned i, unsigned j) and const double& operator()(unsigned i, unsigned j) const. (References are supplied so you can use (,) as an lvalue; e.g. myMatrixObject(i, j) = 1.0)

2) Use the matrix class in BLAS (available at www.boost.org). That contains implementations, amongst other things, sparse matrices and identity matrices.

I prefer (2). I know it's fun to build your own matrix class but "don't re-invent the wheel" does spring to mind.

share|improve this answer

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