Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently started using Snippet 2 instead of Snippet 1, for basic selection statements. This seems a bit un-conventional, so I wanted to know if there is performance difference, or if one seems more readable than the other.

Snippet 1

function foo() {
    if(case1){
        //...
    } else if (case2) {
        //...
    } else if (case3) {
        //...
    } else{
        // catch other cases
    }
}

Snippet 2

function foo() {
    if(case1){
        //...
        return;
    }
    if(case2){
        //...
        return;
    }
    if(case3){
        //...
        return;
    }
    // catch other cases
}
share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by cwallenpoole, Tim B James, Felix Kling, Zirak, Alnitak Jul 2 '13 at 15:49

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
They will differ quite much in the "compiled" code. –  Eric Jul 2 '13 at 15:44
2  
You can test the performance yourself: jsperf.com. –  Felix Kling Jul 2 '13 at 15:45
8  
amazed how many people aren't reading or interpreting this code correctly. –  Alnitak Jul 2 '13 at 15:47
1  
"or if one seems more readable than the other." Subjective question? –  Felix Kling Jul 2 '13 at 15:48
1  
Because I'm surprised the word isn't there yet: the second is called the Guard pattern. –  Florian Margaine Jul 2 '13 at 16:00

5 Answers 5

Your snippets are the same thing. But I'd use elseif even if I return. It kind of gives me a sense that those if statements are related and helps me with readability.

if ... else also helps in performance, let's say, when you're if-ing the same variable. Why test a condition if the previous one succeeded? elseif it so it won't try again.

It's a matter of design. It depends on what you want to achieve so there's no EXACT BEST way of doing it. It's all a matter of how you need to exit your code block that contains the ifs.

share|improve this answer
3  
@sircapsalot: What's the difference? –  Felix Kling Jul 2 '13 at 15:48
2  
+1 because they are the same thing –  Kendall Frey Jul 2 '13 at 15:48
    
@sircapsalot the return statements were apparently there all along, but I did not see them at first either. They threw off my answer a little bit as well - tried to rectify as best as possible. –  Ricky Mutschlechner Jul 2 '13 at 16:01

The Ifs alone mean that all of the conditions can possibly happen - they'll be checked one by one. The chained if-else statements mean that only one of the conditions can actually happen - if one of the conditions get executed, I believe it skips over all of the rest. Most languages support a switch statement as well, which would be somewhat more readable than chaining together a bunch of if-else-if statements. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe this applies in every language I've used so far.

Edit: In this particular case (as pointed out by some others below - thank you), all of the conditions cannot happen because of the return statements in each of the if statements. In a more general case though, my explanation still holds.

share|improve this answer
4  
no, you're wrong. there's a return in each block, so they cannot all happen. –  Alnitak Jul 2 '13 at 15:46
    
how the helsinki did I miss those return statements? my brain entirely skipped over them haha –  sircapsalot Jul 2 '13 at 15:55
    
@pure_code.mom the log doesn't record individual edits made within 5 minutes of each other. –  Alnitak Jul 2 '13 at 15:55
    
@RickyMutschlechner there is no "general case" - the return statements make a massive difference to the semantic intent of the code. –  Alnitak Jul 2 '13 at 15:56
    
@Alnitak Correct, they do. But when I say general case, I mean if(){} if(){} .... vs. if(){} else-if {} else-if{} etc. I meant not including the actual content of what is inside the statements, but rather what comprises the statements themselves. I realized that that didn't actually fully answer the question, hence my edit. I still don't see the problem. –  Ricky Mutschlechner Jul 2 '13 at 15:58

It depends on your needs. As a general rule, the more exit points you have to a function, the harder it is to read. That said, there is often benefit of

if(somehting)
{
    // one liner;
    return;
}
if(something else)
{
    // 30 lines of something else.
    return;
}
// catchall

instead of:

if(something)
{
    // one liner;
    return;
}
else if(something else)
{
    // now nested! 30 lines.
    return;
}

Chances are, though, that you could probably make things even easier to read by turning those conditions into their own functions. Wouldn't this be nice:

if(something)
{
    doSomething();
}
else if(something else)
{
    doSomethingElse();
}
else
{
    doJustElse();
}

The benefit of the last one? Succinct, clear, clean, obvious, and a low learning curve.

share|improve this answer
    
downside of the last one? No access to lexically scoped variables, unless they're passed as parameters. –  Alnitak Jul 2 '13 at 18:21

If you have too many else if statements then it always better to use switch rather than using if.

share|improve this answer
    
not part of the question. –  user1637281 Jul 2 '13 at 15:46
    
i didn't understand why this answer is not part of the question. if-else-vs-switch –  Gyandeep Jul 2 '13 at 15:57

Snippet 1 is going to be better for performance when you don't need case 3 to be satisfied, since the other else if will not be fired. However, if you have a lot of other else if, you should use a switch

share|improve this answer
    
neither fires more ifs than the other... –  dandavis Jul 2 '13 at 15:48
    
If the program needs to fire case 2, with Snippet 1, only the if and first else if will be tested. In snippet 2, all 3 ifs will be tested. Hence, Snippet 1 would be faster. If case 3 needed to be tested, they would be equal. Its a trivial increase, but still –  taylorc93 Jul 2 '13 at 15:49
2  
Do you see the return statement in each if block? –  Felix Kling Jul 2 '13 at 15:50
1  
Wow, i feel like such an idiot now... –  taylorc93 Jul 2 '13 at 15:51