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I'd like to declare an "empty" lambda expression that does, well, nothing. Is there a way to do something like this without needing the DoNothing() method?

    public MyViewModel()
    {
        SomeMenuCommand = new RelayCommand(
                x => DoNothing(),
                x => CanSomeMenuCommandExecute());
    }

    private void DoNothing()
    {
    }

    private bool CanSomeMenuCommandExecute()
    {
        // this depends on my mood
    }

My intent in doing this is only control the enabled/disabled state of my WPF command, but that's an aside. Maybe it's just too early in the morning for me, but I imagine there must be a way to just declare the x => DoNothing() lambda expression in some way like this to accomplish the same thing:

    SomeMenuCommand = new RelayCommand(
        x => (),
        x => CanSomeMenuCommandExecute());

Is there some way to do this? It just seems unnecessary to need a do-nothing method.

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5 Answers

up vote 74 down vote accepted
Action doNothing = () => { };
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Perfect! Thanks! –  unforgiven3 Nov 16 '09 at 16:02
14  
It's childish, but I giggle to myself every time I see ()=> –  Josh Smeaton May 11 '11 at 9:00
2  
@Josh Smeaton: +1, from now on, I will too :) –  Cohen Oct 19 '11 at 12:56
    
The accepted (and great) answer has new meaning in that context. –  Dave Jellison Mar 7 '13 at 14:43
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This should work:

SomeMenuCommand = new RelayCommand(
    x => {},
    x => CanSomeMenuCommandExecute());
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Assuming you only need a delegate (rather than an expression tree) then this should work:

SomeMenuCommand = new RelayCommand(
        x => {},
        x => CanSomeMenuCommandExecute());

(That won't work with expression trees as it's got a statement body. See section 4.6 of the C# 3.0 spec for more details.)

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This is an old question, but I thought I would add some code that I've found useful for this type of situation. I have an Actions static class and a Functions static class with some basic functions in them:

public static class Actions
{
  public static void Empty() { }
  public static void Empty<T>(T value) { }
  public static void Empty<T1, T2>(T1 value1, T2 value2) { }
  /* Put as many overloads as you want */
}

public static class Functions
{
  public static T Identity<T>(T value) { return value; }

  public static T0 Default<T0>() { return default(T0); }
  public static T0 Default<T1, T0>(T1 value1) { return default(T0); }
  /* Put as many overloads as you want */
}

I believe this helps improve readability just a tiny bit:

SomeMenuCommand = new RelayCommand(
        Actions.Empty,
        x => CanSomeMenuCommandExecute());

// Another example:
var lOrderedStrings = GetCollectionOfStrings().OrderBy(Functions.Identity);
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I like this. Hard to believe I asked this question that long ago - how time flies :-) This is useful. –  unforgiven3 Jan 11 '13 at 18:41
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I don't fully understand why do you need a DoNothing method.

Can't you just do:

SomeMenuCommand = new RelayCommand(
                null,
                x => CanSomeMenuCommandExecute());
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1  
That is probably checked and will probably throw a NRE. –  Dykam Nov 16 '09 at 15:50
    
I think Dykam is right, but I just didn't think about passing null :-) –  unforgiven3 Nov 16 '09 at 17:53
1  
I don't understand why this is downvoted? Jorge makes a valid point, although it would have been a small effort to check it. –  Cohen Oct 19 '11 at 12:57
    
+1, this is a valid solution, just that the null checking should be extended in new RelayCommand(... –  nawfal Dec 11 '13 at 14:42
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