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what is the difference between

for(i=0;i<n;i++) printf("Hello");

and

for(i=0;i<n;) printf("Hello");

I have seen the two types of code used in multiple places and could not figure out the difference.

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3  
your second loop is infinite since you are not changing the value of i –  Alexis Jul 2 '13 at 16:36
    
@Manoj, or did you mean for( ;i<n; i++) printf("Hello"); –  VoidPointer Jul 2 '13 at 16:38

5 Answers 5

The only difference I see is the "i++" part. That increments i in the first loop, but it doesn't increment in the second loop. Unless n<=0, the second loop will never end. This is called an infinite loop.

I'd highly recommend reading more on loops with C:

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cprogramming/c_loops.htm

http://www.codingunit.com/c-tutorial-for-loop-while-loop-break-and-continue

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The second one doesn't have a post-loop afterthought. It's optional, but most of the time you update the index there.

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The one without i++ runs forever. There's nothing to increment it to reach it's final condition.

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The second code does not have an i++. This means it does not alter the index variable i during iterations.

The first line

for(i=0;i<n;i++) printf("Hello");

Can be translated to

int i=0;
while(i<n)
{
 printf("Hello");
 i++;
}

While the second

for(i=0;i<n;) printf("Hello");

would translate to

int i=0;
while (i<n)
{
 printf("Hello");
}

Since i does not change, it will loop infinitely

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for(i=0;i<n;) printf("Hello"); this code will never terminate unless you explicitly modify your i in the body of your loop.

for(i=0;i<n;){
i++;
printf("Hello");
}

will be a valid ever terminated loop.

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