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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;


class B {
private:
  class A;
  friend void f ( A Aobj );
  B ( int i ) {}
};

class A{
};


void f ( A Aobj ) {
  B Bobj ( 1 );
}

int main() {      
}

g++ produces the following error:

$ g++ a.cpp
a.cpp: In function ‘void f(A)’:
a.cpp:10: error: ‘B::B(int)’ is private
a.cpp:18: error: within this context

The error goes off if any of the following changes are made: 1. Remove the "int i" from the constructor of B. 2. Change the data type of f from A to anything else: eg void f ( int Aobj ). 3. Define class A prior to B and remove the forward declaration of A.

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2 Answers 2

The problem is that the friend function takes a B::A, where the function later on in the file takes a A. Move the forward declaration of class A out of B.

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+1 This seems about right. –  Alok Save Jul 2 '13 at 18:25
    
+1, same as above. Your f() declaration is a different function from the f() you mention as a friend in declaration of B(). –  ondav Jul 2 '13 at 18:28
    
Yep that makes sense. Thank you :) –  Curious Jul 2 '13 at 18:31
    
OK, but can you now explain the observed compilation results when you remove the int parameter from the constructor? Why does it compile in that case? –  ondav Jul 2 '13 at 18:32
    
@ondav: Perhaps that is related to the Most Vexing Parse? –  Mankarse Jul 2 '13 at 18:34

You've declared the constructor of B - the function B (int i){} as a private method. You want to make this public, like so:

class B {
private:
  class A;
  friend void f ( A Aobj );
public:
  B ( int i ) {}
};

**EDITED

If you want to keep the constructor private, that shouldn't be an issue. Looking at it again, I realize the error lies with the forward declaration of the class A. You've declared A in the class definition of B, and then try to use it in the function header for f. The problem is that you haven't defined A fully, so you cannot reference the object yet - the compiler doesn't know how much memory A takes up, so the function cannot be defined. To fix this, you either need to fully define class A before any reference to it, or switch f to take a pointer to A (i.e. void f (A* Aobj)). Pointers are a fixed size, so they can be used even if A hasn't been defined fully yet.

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f is a friend of B. So f should be able to access B's private methods as well. –  Curious Jul 2 '13 at 18:08
    
Also please note that the in the original code, if the parameter ("int i") to B's constructor is removed, it compiles fine. –  Curious Jul 2 '13 at 18:20
    
I've edited to better answer, I think. I'm pretty sure what happens when you remove the parameter is that the compiler assumes you are using the implicit constructor, which is public. –  rkevingibson Jul 2 '13 at 18:31
    
@rkevingibson I do not think so. When you explicitly define the private constructor, the compiler cannot override it to public. Or can it? I must delve into the standard ... –  ondav Jul 2 '13 at 18:36

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