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Let’s say I have a template function, assign(). It takes a pointer and a value and assigns the value to the pointer’s target:

template <typename T> void assign(T *a, T b) { *a = b; }

int main() {
    double i;
    assign(&i, 2);
}

In this case I always want T to be deduced from the first argument, but it looks like I didn’t do a good job of expressing this. 2’s type is int, so:

deduce.cpp:5:5: error: no matching function for call to 'assign'
    assign(&i, 2);
    ^~~~~~
deduce.cpp:1:28: note: candidate template ignored: deduced conflicting types for parameter 'T' ('double' vs. 'int')
template  void assign(T *a, T b) { *a = b; }

Is there a way I can declare assign() so that the second argument doesn’t participate in template parameter deduction?

share|improve this question
    
So, one problem with the above is inefficiency. Suppose T is std::vector. The argument b is taken by-value, then copied (not moved) into a. A small improvement might be changing the implementation of assign to *a = std::move(b), which for primitive types costs nothing, and for complex types could save a lot. A large improvement would be to perfect forward b. –  Yakk Jul 3 '13 at 4:00
    
@Yakk Totally agreed — I just wrote it as an example of a function that takes a pointer to and value of the same type. In actuality it only takes primitives and is more useful than this guy :). –  Sidnicious Jul 3 '13 at 17:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Using two type parameters is probably the best option, but if you really want to perform deduction only from the first argument, simply make the second non-deducible:

template<typename T>
void assign( T* a, typename std::identity<T>::type b );

An earlier version of this answer suggested using the template alias feature introduced in C++11. But template aliases are still a deducible context. The primary reason that std::identity and std::remove_reference prevents deduction is that template classes can be specialized, so even if you have a typedef of a template type parameter, it's possible that another specialization has a typedef of the same type. Because of the possible ambiguity, deduction doesn't take place. But template aliases preclude specialization, and so deduction still occurs.

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+1. Given the edit to the question (which I missed), this seems to be the right answer. –  Andy Prowl Jul 2 '13 at 18:43
    
This is a really cool answer but it doesn’t work for me. I get the same “conflicting types” error from my compiler: ideone.com/GIJbj1 –  Sidnicious Jul 2 '13 at 19:19
    
Looks like std::remove_reference is equivalent (if a little less readable), too. –  Sidnicious Jul 2 '13 at 19:21
    
@Sidnicious: My bad, looks like template aliases are still deducible :( –  Ben Voigt Jul 2 '13 at 19:51
    
There is no std::identity, is there? –  aschepler Jul 2 '13 at 20:44

The problem is that the compiler is deducing conflicting information from the first and the second argument. From the first argument, it deduces T to be double (i is a double); from the second one, it deduces T to be int (the type of 2 is int).

You have two main possibilities here:

  • Always be explicit about the type of your arguments:

    assign(&i, 2.0);
    //         ^^^^
    
  • Or let your function template accept two template parameters:

    template <typename T, typename U> 
    void assign(T *a, U b) { *a = b; }
    

    In this case, you may want to SFINAE-constraint the template so that it does not partecipate to overload resolution in case U is not convertible to T:

    #include <type_traits>
    
    template <typename T, typename U,
        typename std::enable_if<
            std::is_convertible<U, T>::value>::type* = nullptr>
    void assign(T *a, U b) { *a = b; }
    

    If you do not need to exclude your function from the overload set when U is not convertible to T, you may want to have a static assertion inside assign() to produce a nicer compilation error:

    #include <type_traits>
    
    template<typename T, typename U>
    void assign(T *a, U b)
    {
        static_assert(std::is_convertible<T, U>::value,
            "Error: Source type not convertible to destination type.");
    
        *a = b;
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Or static_assert within the function, since you don't have another overload that is viable in the non-convertible case. –  Praetorian Jul 2 '13 at 18:33
    
@Praetorian: Or that, yes. I wasn't thinking of it because the function is small and the error message would be understandable anyway, but you're right, it's an option –  Andy Prowl Jul 2 '13 at 18:34
    
Sorry about the late edit — this is a pretty legit answer. Upvoted, at least. –  Sidnicious Jul 2 '13 at 18:48
    
@Sidnicious: No problem :) –  Andy Prowl Jul 2 '13 at 18:48

It's just that the value 2 is deduced to the type int, which doesn't match the template parameter deduced by &i. You need to use the value as a double:

assign(&i, 2.0);
share|improve this answer
    
I know. That works but it’s brittle and ugly — if i is an unsigned long then my second argument has to be 2ul, if it’s a float it has to be (float)2, etc. In the real code, it takes a few arguments and gets nasty fast. –  Sidnicious Jul 2 '13 at 18:33
    
@Sidnicious Then I guess you might want to go with Andy's answer. –  0x499602D2 Jul 2 '13 at 18:36

Why not just use two independent parameter types, one for the source and one for the destination?

template <typename D, typename S> void assign(D *a, S b) { *a = b; }

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    double i;
    assign(&i, 2);
    return 0;
}

If the assignment is not possible, the template instantiation won't compile.

share|improve this answer
1  
odd using D for the source and S for the destination –  Ben Voigt Jul 2 '13 at 18:37
    
@Ben: Indeed :) Just swapped them. –  Vlad Jul 2 '13 at 21:03
    
If you are going to do this, why not forward S perfectly? –  Yakk Jul 3 '13 at 3:57

My attempt would look something like this:

template<typename T, typename U>
typename std::enable_if< std::is_convertible< U&&, T >::value >::type // not quite perfect
assign( T* dest, U&& src ) {
  *dest = std::forward<U>(src);
}

the second argument is anything you can convert to a T, but we take it by universal reference and conditionally move it into *dest. I test for convertability in the signature rather than have the body fail to compile, because failure-to-find-an-overload seems more polite than failing to compile-the-body.

Live example.

Compared to the simpler:

template<typename T>
void assign( T* dest, typename std::identity<T>::type src ) {
  *dest = std::move(src);
}

the above saves 1 move. If you have an expensive to move class, or a class that is copy-only and expensive to copy, this could save a significant amount.

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Alternatively, you can use decltype to typecast the second argument to be the type of first.

template <typename T> void assign(T *a, T b) { *a = b; }

int main() {
    double i;
    assign(&i, (decltype(i))2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but you have to remember to do that every time you call it. It gets ugly fast — I posted this question because was I was trying to improve a function took several numbers as arguments. Casts everywhere! –  Sidnicious Jul 3 '13 at 17:55

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