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I was given this code:

  class Record
    {
   private:
      unsigned short size_of_buffer;
      char* buffer;

   public:
      bool was_marked_as_deleted();
    };  


bool Record::was_marked_as_deleted(){

        if (buffer == NULL)
            return false;

        stringstream stream;
        stream.write(buffer,size_of_buffer);
        stream.seekg(0,stream.beg);

        unsigned short size_of_first_field = 0;
        stream.read( (char*)(&size_of_first_field) , sizeof(size_of_first_field) );

        if (size_of_first_field > 1)
            return false;

        char first_field = 1;
        stream.read( (char*)(&first_field) , sizeof(first_field) );
        if ( first_field != MARK_DELETED )
            return false;

        return true; 

    }

The above function is

  • very inefficient, because of the stream.write(buffer,size_of_buffer); line
  • unreadable.

So I want to refactor it using memcpy instead of stringstreams. This is what I came up with:

bool Record::was_marked_as_deleted(){

    if(buffer==NULL)
        return false;

    unsigned short size_of_first_field= 0;
    memcpy(&size_of_first_field,buffer,sizeof(size_of_first_field));

    if (size_of_first_field > 1)
        return false;

    char first_field = 1;

    //This line produces valgrind error
    //EDIT: fixed it with the following IF statement
    if (size_of_buffer > sizeof(size_of_first_field))
         memcpy(&first_field,buffer+sizeof(size_of_first_field),sizeof(first_field));

    if (first_field != MARK_DELETED )
        return false;

    return true;
}

Now, the problem is that my program runs fine, but when I run it with valgrind, I get this:

==17340== Invalid read of size 1
==17340==    at 0x8059452: Record::was_marked_as_deleted() (Record.cpp:161)
==17340==  Address 0x5af2832 is 0 bytes after a block of size 2 alloc'd

Why is this? Why does my program fail under valgrind but not on normal execution?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you say that stream.write is very inefficient? it is not even performing any check on the input. Is this being called in a real time fashion? or a really big amount of time? if not, you probably wouldn't notice the difference –  Pedrom Jul 2 '13 at 18:59
    
It's being called many times. Doesn't the function copy the contents of buffer into the stream? –  l19 Jul 2 '13 at 19:00
    
Just in the same way that memcpy, you wouldn't see the difference. Check what Captain Obvlious says which is the same answer I was about to give you. –  Pedrom Jul 2 '13 at 19:19

1 Answer 1

Both std::stringstream and memcpy are inefficient for this type of operation. Just access the buffer directly like so...

bool Record::was_marked_as_deleted()
{
    if (buffer == NULL || size_of_buffer < 3)
        return false;

    unsigned short size_of_first_field
        = reinterpret_cast<unsigned short*>(buffer)[0];

    if (size_of_first_field > 1)
        return false;

    if (buffer[3] != MARK_DELETED)
        return false;

    return true;
}

Or use a data structure...

bool Record::was_marked_as_deleted()
{
    if (buffer == NULL || size_of_buffer < 3)
        return false;

    // Add packing directives if necessary. i.e. #pragma pack
    struct Data { unsigned short size; char flag; };

    Data *field = reinterpret_cast<Data*>(buffer);

    if (field->size > 1)
        return false;

    if (field->flag != MARK_DELETED)
        return false;

    return true;
}
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