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I have a simple string that I'm trying to determine if a specific index results in a specific char.

I'm trying to do it like this (but I get compilation errors):

if(myString.charAt(7).equals("/")) {
    // do stuff
} else {
   // do other stuff
}

Error:

Type mismatch: cannot convert from char to boolean

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Is this a direct copy paste from your code? Because that won't compile with it missing a ) like that. –  corsiKa Jul 2 '13 at 19:49
    
String#charAt() returns a char, not a String. –  Matt Ball Jul 2 '13 at 19:49
    
Thanks, simple typo! It is NOT a copy and paste from my code. –  inquisitor Jul 2 '13 at 19:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
(myString.charAt(7).equals("/")

should be following because charAt() returns char:

myString.charAt(7) == '/'
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if(myString.charAt(7)== '/') {
    // do stuff
} else {
   // do other stuff
}

Putting a character in double quotes makes it a String. Single quotes makes it a char. And you compare characters with literal == whereas you compare Objects with the equals method

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It would probably compile with .equals() and autobox it, so be careful! You might run into a significant performance hit if you don't. –  corsiKa Jul 2 '13 at 19:55
1  
if you run myString.charAt(7).equals('/') it won't autobox it. Rather, you will receive a compilation error that a char cannot be deferenced –  sunrize920 Jul 2 '13 at 20:01
    
Thanks for explaining the difference in the quotes. –  inquisitor Jul 2 '13 at 20:08

There's a couple solutions on this answer that give you what you were probably trying to do, which is compare a single character to another single character. I won't go over that because they've done excellently.

But you can still use a String if you like, and prepare for the future. (Perhaps "/" changes to "//"?) you can do this:

if(myString.substring(7,8).equals("/")) {
    // stuff
}

Then down the road you might be like

public static final String SEPARATOR_STRING = "//";
public static final int SEPARATOR_START = 7;
public static final int SEPARATOR_END = 7 + SEPARATOR_STRING.length();

// later
if(myString.substring(SEPARATOR_START,7SEPARATOR_END).equals(SEPARATOR_STRING)) {
    // stuff
}
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Thank you for the very thorough explanation. –  inquisitor Jul 2 '13 at 20:04

charAt() returns char, not object, so you need to compare it that way:

if(myString.charAt(7)== '/') {
...

note the single quote around /.

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if(myString.substring(7,8).equals("/")) 

or

if(myString.charAt(7)=='/')

or

if(myString.indexOf("/"))==7)  can be use
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The first is a compilation error, the second is performing an assignment and is therefore incorrect. –  ardentsonata Jul 2 '13 at 20:03
    
first two are wrong mate. for the reasons @ardentsonata pointed out –  sunrize920 Jul 2 '13 at 20:03
    
Ohh that's was a terrible mistake. Thank you both for pointing me out :) –  Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera Jul 2 '13 at 20:07

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