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I'm working through K&R, using Clang as my compiler.

Exercise 1-16 produces the "conflicting types for 'getline'" error when compiled with Clang. I'm guessing because one of the default libraries has a getline function.

What options should I pass to Clang when compiling K&R exercises so as to avoid anything else being included?

The exercise sample to be modified is:

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAXLINE 1000

int getline(char line[], int maxline);
void copy(char to[], char from[]);

/* print longest input line */
main()
{
  int len; /* current line length */
  int max; /* maximum line lenght seen so far */
  char line[MAXLINE]; /* current input line */
  char longest[MAXLINE]; /* longest line saved here */

  max = 0;

  while ((len = getline(line, MAXLINE)) > 0)
    if ( len > max) {
      max = len;
      copy(longest, line); /* line -> longest */
    }

  if (max > 0) /* there was a line */
    printf("\n\nLength: %d\nString: %s", max -1, longest);
  return 0;
}

/* getline: read a line into s, return length */
int getline(char s[], int lim)
{
  int c,i;

  for (i=0; i<lim-1 && (c=getchar()) != EOF && c!='\n'; ++i)
    s[i] = c;

  if (c == '\n') {
    s[i] = c;
    ++i;
  }

  s[i] = '\0';
  return i;
}

/* copy: copy "from" into "to"; assume to is big enough */
void copy(char to[], char from[])
{
  int i;

  i = 0;

  while((to[i] = from[i]) != '\0')
    ++i;
}

The errors from Clang when invoked as: cc ex1-16.c -o ex1-16

ex1-16.c:4:5: error: conflicting types for 'getline'
int getline(char line[], int maxline);
    ^
/usr/include/stdio.h:449:9: note: previous declaration is here
ssize_t getline(char ** __restrict, size_t * __restrict, FILE *...
        ^
ex1-16.c:17:38: error: too few arguments to function call, expected 3, have 2
  while ((len = getline(line, MAXLINE)) > 0)
                ~~~~~~~              ^
/usr/include/stdio.h:449:1: note: 'getline' declared here
ssize_t getline(char ** __restrict, size_t * __restrict, FILE *...
^
ex1-16.c:29:5: error: conflicting types for 'getline'
int getline(char s[], int lim)
    ^
/usr/include/stdio.h:449:9: note: previous declaration is here
ssize_t getline(char ** __restrict, size_t * __restrict, FILE *...
        ^
3 errors generated.
share|improve this question
    
For people who don't have a copy of K&R handy, can you post an example program and the errors you get when trying to compile it? –  simonc Jul 2 '13 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is just that your system already provides a function called getline. man getline should tell you its signature. On my system it's:

ssize_t getline(char ** restrict linep, size_t * restrict linecapp, FILE * restrict stream);

You can either match that or just rename your function to be called 'mygetline' or something like that.

Alternately, if you can avoid including stdio.h, you can avoid the problem entirely.

As to your final question:

What options should I pass to Clang when compiling K&R exercises so as to avoid anything else being included?

You can't - the system headers are what they are, and have presumably moved on since K&R was last revised in 1988. There have been multiple C standard updates since then. In some ways K&R is really starting to get long in the tooth.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah. It didn't occur to me that it was in stdio.h. I've used Unix for some time now, but am learning C exactly so I can become more intimately familiar in this way. Thank you! –  retrodev Jul 2 '13 at 20:04
1  
@retrodev - the error message explicitly says the previous definition is in stdio.h: "/usr/include/stdio.h:449:9: note: previous declaration is here". –  Carl Norum Jul 2 '13 at 20:11
1  
getline is defined by POSIX, but not by ANSI or ISO C. You should be able to use that name in your own code as long as you invoke the compiler in some standard-conforming mode. On my system, the declaration of getline in <stdio.h> is protected by #ifdefs. Though I suppose using names that conflict with POSIX standard functions is something to be avoided. –  Keith Thompson Jul 2 '13 at 20:38

Here is a similar question: Why do I get a "conflicting types for getline" error when compiling the longest line example in chapter 1 of K&R2?

It's the same issue but with gcc. A solution is to put the compiler into ANSI C mode, which disables GNU/POSIX extensions.

Try the following:

$ clang test.c -ansi 

or alternatively

$ clang test.c -std=c89

Tested sucessfully on my machine:

$ clang --version
clang version 3.3 (tags/RELEASE_33/rc2)
Target: x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix

With this compiler on a machine at my university it was not even required to specify the ANSI mode for successful compilation:

->clang --version
Apple clang version 1.7 (tags/Apple/clang-77) (based on LLVM 2.9svn)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin10
Thread model: posix
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work, the system definition will still conflict with OP's. –  Carl Norum Jul 2 '13 at 20:01
    
@CarlNorum it works for me –  moooeeeep Jul 2 '13 at 20:02
1  
I still get the error with the -ansi option. I'll just rename the function. –  retrodev Jul 2 '13 at 20:05
1  
Must be a header difference on Linux vs. Mac OS X then. A quick check of the linux man page shows that glibc has macros to test for its presence, which is why -ansi and -std=c89 work for you. Mac OS X doesn't have such guards. The glibc feature test from my linux box, for reference: _POSIX_C_SOURCE >= 200809L || _XOPEN_SOURCE >= 700. –  Carl Norum Jul 2 '13 at 20:14
1  
@CarlNorum: That's weird. No version of the ANSI or ISO C standard defines a function called getline, which means that a conforming compiler must permit that name to be used in user code. If cc -ansi or cc -std=c89 (or c90, or c99, or c11) still gives you a conflict, then there's a bug in cc (or whatever cc invokes). It works correctly with both gcc and clang on my Linux system. –  Keith Thompson Jul 2 '13 at 20:35

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