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I am running a bash script (test.sh) and it loads in environment variables (from env.sh). That works fine, but I am trying to see python can just load in the variables already in the bash script.

Yes I know it would probably be easier to just pass in the specific variables I need as arguments, but I was curious if it was possible to get the bash variables.

test.sh

#!/bin/bash
source env.sh

echo $test1

python pythontest.py

env.sh

 #!/bin/bash

test1="hello"

pythontest.py

?
print test1 (that is what I want)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You need to export the variables in bash, or they will be local to bash:

export test1

Then, in python

import os
print os.environ["test1"]
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I am curious, is there an easy way to export all of the variables? –  Tall Paul Jul 2 '13 at 20:26
1  
@TallPaul The os.environ dictionary already contains all variables that can be seen by the program. –  Bakuriu Jul 2 '13 at 20:44
2  
set -a; source env.sh; set +a. The -a option instructs bash to export each new variable until you turn it off with +a. –  chepner Jul 2 '13 at 20:47

Assuming the environment variables that get set are permanent, which I think they are not. You can use os.environ.

os.environ["something"]
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John how would I set the variables permanently? –  Tall Paul Jul 2 '13 at 20:24
    
add set -a before the ource command (on a separate line). This says, that from now on, any variable set should automatically be exported. –  AMADANON Inc. Jul 2 '13 at 20:52
1  
@TallPaul, it is as AMADANON Inc. says. However you can set variables for the current environment from python. –  John Jul 2 '13 at 21:06

I created a little library that does this:

https://github.com/aneilbaboo/shellvars-py

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