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I am trying to find the cleanest way to do something special for the first item in an array, then do something different for all the rest. So far I have something like this:

puts @model.children.first.full_name
@model.children[1..@model.children.count].each do |child|
  puts child.short_name
end

I don't like how I have to specify the count in the range. I would like to find a shorter way to specify "from the second item to the last". How can this be done?

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Duplicate of Discriminate first and last element in each?. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 2 '13 at 22:12
    
One thing to remember: In the search for "tight" code, it's easy to lose sight of readability and maintainability. It's very obvious what [1..@model.children.count] is doing. Finding alternate ways of doing the same thing shouldn't sacrifice that. Using -1 is the most obvious short-cut to replace @model.children.count. –  the Tin Man Jul 2 '13 at 22:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Ruby has a cool way of doing this with the splat operator *. Here is an example:

a = [1,2,3,4]
first, *rest = *a
puts first # 1
puts rest # [2,3,4]
puts a # [1,2,3,4]

Here is your code rewritten:

first, *rest = @model.children
puts first.full_name
rest.each do |child|
  puts child.short_name
end

I hope this helps!

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1  
For me, pattern matching is so elegant. +1 –  iain Jul 2 '13 at 22:01
1  
Nice! I like it. –  Andrew Jul 2 '13 at 23:42

You can take this approach:

@model.children[1..-1].each do |child|
  puts child.short_name
end
share|improve this answer

You might use drop:

puts @model.children.first.full_name
@model.children.drop(1).each do |child|
  puts child.short_name
end
share|improve this answer
1  
is this a destructive action? or does drop return a copy? –  Andrew Jul 2 '13 at 21:46
    
@Andrew drop is not destructive. –  iain Jul 2 '13 at 21:59

Something like this?:

puts @model.children.first.full_name
@model.children[1..-1].each do |child|
  puts child.short_name
end
share|improve this answer
    
I beat you by +9 sec :) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 2 '13 at 21:31
    
So close..., probably was what it took me to write the puts line :P –  NicoSantangelo Jul 2 '13 at 21:32
    
@JanDvorak What does mean - FGITW . I am stupid to understand short form.. :( –  Arup Rakshit Jul 2 '13 at 21:33
1  
Fastest Gun in the West –  NicoSantangelo Jul 2 '13 at 21:33
    
what that phrase mean? :)) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 2 '13 at 21:34

Your title says you want to omit n elements, but the OP text only asks for treating the first element specially. In case you are interested in the more general nanswer, here is one concise option:

n = 1 # how many elements to omit
@model.children.drop( n ).map( &:short_name ).each &method( :puts )
share|improve this answer
    
puts @model.children.drop( n ).map( &:short_name ) would have worked too. –  the Tin Man Jul 2 '13 at 22:34
    
Would it? I'm not that familiar with the way puts handles its args, and I like to promote &method( ... ) trick someone else taught me here on SO recently. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 2 '13 at 22:38
    
Yes, puts takes arrays and single elements. With arrays it iterates over them, putting each element on a single line. And, yes, &method(...) is a nice trick, but it's a shiny new hammer and not everything needs to be hit with it. –  the Tin Man Jul 2 '13 at 22:41
    
Thanks for explanations, especially on puts. Many times as I've used puts, I never bothered to read the doc or its source, I've remedied that thanks to you :-))) –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 3 '13 at 0:00

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