Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a method that should take already assigned users out of a list and keep non-assigned ones in a list. The GuidList has the userId added to it on a button click. The profileList is used to populate a gridView.

Here is the code:

private VList<VW_profiles> FilterAssigned(VList<VW_profiles> profileList)
{
	VList<VW_profiles> sortedList = new VList<VW_profiles>();
	foreach(VW_profiles profile in profileList)
	{
		if(GuidList.Count > 0)
		{
			foreach(Guid userId in GuidList)
			{
				if(profile.UserId != userId)
				{
					sortedList.Add(profile)
				}
			}
		}		
		else
		{
			sortedList = profileList;
		}
	}
	return sortedList;
}

Now here's my problem. Everythings seems to work well up until all of the items in the profileList have also been added to the GuidList. Then instead of doing a negate on the two Guid ID's, we start adding everyone in again. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to do this is a more effecient way and to avoid the adding in once we've taken everything out.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
But where is sorting being handled exactly? –  Groo Nov 16 '09 at 17:56
    
why not doing this with lambda expressions, it would be much less code, and faster –  Omu Nov 16 '09 at 18:54
    
I would have wrote a lambda, but I can't understand what your code should do –  Omu Nov 16 '09 at 18:56
    
I guess I should have said that I was using .net 2.0. –  Chris Nov 16 '09 at 19:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is in this code:

foreach(Guid userId in GuidList)
{
    if(profile.UserId != userId)
    {
        sortedList.Add(profile)
    }
}

It should be more like:

bool inList = false;
foreach(Guid userId in GuidList)
{
    if(profile.UserId == userId)
    {
        inList = true;
    }
}
if (!inList)
    sortedList.Add(profile)

or, the more LINQ-style:

bool inList = GuidList.Any(x => x == profile.UserId);
if (!inList)
    sortedList.Add(profile)

your current code is more like:

GuidList.Where(x => x != profile.UserId)
        .Foreach(x => sortedList.Add(x));

which I'm thinking isn't what you want :)

share|improve this answer
    
That was it! I was missing the boolean switch there. I like the ideas of using lambda or LINQ, except I'm working with the 2.0 framework and don't have access to those features. –  Chris Nov 16 '09 at 19:18

If VList<T> is a List<T>, then you can do this:

profileList.RemoveAll(profile => GuidList.Contains(profile.UserId));

If performance is an issue and there are LOTS of Guids to remove, then you can make GuidList a HashSet<Guid>.

Edit Based on comments: If you don't want to modify the original list, then do this:

var filtered = new VList<VW_profiles>(
    profileList.Where(profile => !GuidList.Contains(profile.UserId)));

Edit If you are not using a List<T>, here is a method you can use on resizable lists implementing IList<T> and one you can use on arrays (T[]). By only ever removing items from the end of the list, what would be an O(n²) algorithm will be O(n) for most implementations of IList<T>.

public static void RemoveAll<T>(this IList<T> list, Predicate<T> match)
{
    if (list == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("list");
    if (match == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("match");
    if (list is T[])
        throw new ArgumentException("Arrays cannot be resized.");

    // early out
    if (list.Count == 0)
        return;

    // List<T> provides special handling
    List<T> genericList = list as List<T>;
    if (genericList != null)
    {
        genericList.RemoveAll(match);
        return;
    }

    int targetIndex = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
    {
        if (!match(list[i]) && targetIndex != i)
        {
            list[targetIndex] = list[i];
            targetIndex++;
        }
    }

    // Unfortunately IList<T> doesn't have RemoveRange either
    for (int i = list.Count - 1; i >= targetIndex; i--)
    {
        list.RemoveAt(i);
    }
}

public static void RemoveAll<T>(ref T[] array, Predicate<T> match)
{
    if (array == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
    if (match == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("match");

    int targetIndex = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!match(array[i]) && targetIndex != i)
        {
            array[targetIndex] = array[i];
            targetIndex++;
        }
    }

    if (targetIndex != array.Length)
    {
        Array.Resize(ref array, targetIndex);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, made me cry, ty –  Rubens Farias Nov 16 '09 at 17:50
1  
+1, although note that this will modify the original list. I am not sure if that is intended. –  Groo Nov 16 '09 at 17:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.