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I have a local table variable in the function, and a child function that's supposed to have a variable with the same name, while still being able to access parent's variable. This should be obvious and straightforward, but, unfortunately, JavaScript doesn't let me access parent's variable if I define a local variable with the same name anywhere:

var p = {alpha : 'beta'};

console.debug (p);
// [08:16:21.896] ({alpha:"beta"})
// Okay.

(function() {
    console.debug (p);
    // [08:16:21.896] ({alpha:"beta"})
    // Right! JavaScript, you're so awesome!
})();

// One moment though, I think I still need the parent's table...
(function() {
    var p = { 'p': p };
    console.debug (p);
    // [08:16:21.896] ({p:(void 0)})
    // Wait, what?
})();

// Okay, maybe giving it the same name in the same statement confuses you?
(function() {
    var parent_p = p;
    var p = {};
    console.debug (parent_p);
    // [08:16:21.897] undefined
})();
// Give me back my variable! http://v.gd/jsWhyDoYouDoThis

What's going on there? Is there any way to work around this?

share|improve this question
    
Why does it have to have the same name? Can you access window.p or whatever the node equivalent is if you're running node? Anyway, variable hoisting. –  Dave Newton Jul 3 '13 at 0:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Although JavaScript looks like C, Java and others, they have block-level scope. JavaScript has function-level scope.

So in JavaScript an if statement does not create a new block. Only functions do. On top of that, variable and function declarations are "hoisted" (invisibly moved) to the top of the block. That's the reason of your problem.

When you define a variable:

function foo() {
    bar();
    var x = 1;
}

is actually interpreted like:

function foo() {
    var x;
    bar();
    x = 1;
}

So if you read a varible x in bar(), even if it is defined in a higher scope (outside foo()), it reads foo()'s x, which is undefined when bar() is executed.

Taking a closer look at your code, trying to understand what happens in practice:

var p = {alpha : 'beta'};
...    
(function() {
    // var p = { 'p': p }; actually is:
    var p;
    p = { 'p': p }; // thus p inside is `undefined`
    console.debug (p);
})();

(function() {
    // var parent_p = p; var p = {};  actually is:
    var parent_p, p;
    parent_p = p; // that's why parent_p becomes undefined here
    p = {};
    console.debug (parent_p);
})();
share|improve this answer

No, there is no way to do this in standard ECMAScript.

A var declaration anywhere inside a block is a directive to the JS parser that all use of the named variable in that block refers to a local variable. In JS, a block for this purpose is the surrounding function, or global if not in a function definition(*).

Consequently in your last example you are assigning parent_p with the value of the local variable p, which as you haven't assigned it anything yet is undefined.

You would have to use an intermediate scope to save the reference if you absolutely must reuse the variable name:

(function() {
    var parent_p = p;
    (function() {
        var p = {};
        console.debug (parent_p);
    })();
})();

A future revision of ECMAScript is likely to pick up the Mozilla JS extension let which introduces smaller blocks for definitions than functions. This would let you spell this more simply:

(function() {
    var parent_p = p;
    let (p = {}) {
        console.debug (parent_p);
    }
})();

Another common approach is to pass the variable in as an argument:

(function(parent_p) {
    var p = {};
    console.debug (parent_p);
})(p);

(*: You can read variables from the global scope using the global object - ie window.p - but you can't get local variables from enclosing non-global scopes.)

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Is that how Mozilla implemented let so far? I thought it should be used like { let p = {}; console.log (parent_p); } (this works in node/v8 with --harmony --use-strict; your version doesn't). –  bfavaretto Jul 3 '13 at 1:08
    
Both syntaxes (mine is a 'let statement'; yours is a 'let definition') should work (and do for me in Firefox 20). –  bobince Jul 3 '13 at 1:12
    
The "statements" and "expressions" do work in Firefox, but I'm wondering if that's Mozilla-specific. They don't work on node, and I couldn't find them in the current ES6 draft (where the "definitions" seem to be called "declarations"). I still have a lot to read and learn from the drafts though. –  bfavaretto Jul 3 '13 at 1:39

As alternate view on acdcjunior's correct answer:

Due to function scope (no block-scope) and hoisting, this:

(function() {
    var parent_p = p;
    var p = {};
    console.debug (parent_p);
    // [08:16:21.897] undefined
})();

becomes:

(function() {
    var parent_p, p;  //both undefined
    parent_p = p;     //undefined
    p = {};
    console.debug (parent_p);
    // [08:16:21.897] undefined
})();

So to solve this, you'd access the variable as property of the object that contains it; in this case window is the 'host'/'root' object that holds p as one of it's direct properties.

(function() {
    var parent_p = window.p,
               p = {};
    console.debug (parent_p);
    // [08:16:21.897] ({alpha:"beta"})
})();
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