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I need help resolving this issue. Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

struct Person{
    char *name[100];
    char *nationality[100];
};

void put_values(struct Person *p, const char *name){
  strncpy(p->name, name, 500);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    struct Person *person = malloc(sizeof(struct Person));
    put_values(person, argv[1]);
    free(person);
    return 0;
}

And here is the error message:

ex17t.c: In function ‘put_values’:
ex17t.c:19:3: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘strncpy’ from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]
In file included from ex17t.c:4:0:
/usr/include/string.h:131:14: note: expected ‘char * __restrict__’ but argument is of   type ‘char **’

Any help or tips would be appreciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
char *name[100] is appropriate for a person with over 90 names. You mean char name[100]. If you go for 200 nationalities, you can have true 'citizens of the world'; there are only about 180 nationalities, I believe. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 3 '13 at 3:04
    
Why is the third argument of strncpy 500? Where did 500 came from? – AnT Jul 3 '13 at 3:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your code, name means an array of 100 char pointers. But for strncpy, the first argument is a pointer of char. so you should do like this:

struct Person{
    char name[100];
    char nationality[100];
};
share|improve this answer

Your structure should be (without the * characters):

struct Person {
    char name[100];
    char nationality[100];
};

The way you had it, name is actually an array of 100 character pointers rather then 100 characters. Unless your name is Juan Romirez Sancho Ricardo Agusti Donatello Alfonso ... Ramundo Ronaldo Bus Stop F’tang-F’tang Ole Biscuit Barrell and you want to be able to process each name independently, that's probably not what you're after.

It's also probably not wise to limit your strncpy to 500 characters when the field you're trying to copy in to has only 100 :-)

share|improve this answer

The error is in the declaration of Person:

struct Person{
    char name[100];
    char nationality[100];
};

Your declaration suggests a person with 100 possible names and 100 possible nationalities, which must be dynamically allocated. This is not the intended use of Person: it appears that you wanted a single name / nationality, with 99 characters + the null terminator each.

share|improve this answer

By defining

struct Person{
    char *name[100];
    char *nationality[100];
};

You have a pointer to an array of chars. Since an array of chars is equivalent to a pointer to a bunch of chars, char *name[100] is the equivalent to a pointer to a bunch of pointers to a bunch of chars. That might be useful if you intended to have multiple groups of 100 char arrays, but it is clear that this wasn't your intention.

strncpy(p->name, name, 500);

Under the above definition would be trying to copy the string into a pointer that points to a bunch of chars, instead of the desired

struct Person{
    char name[100];
    char nationality[100];
};

strncpy(p->name, name, 500);

which copies the string into a bunch of chars.

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