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This code is based on an elegant answer I received to this question and scaled up to accept nested lists of up to 5 elements. The overall goal is to merge nested lists that have repeating value in index position 1.

The exception pass suppresses the IndexError when a nested list in marker_array has 4 elements. But the code fails to include the last list after the 4 element list in the final output. My understanding was that the purpose of defaultdict was to avoid IndexErrors in the first place.

# Nested list can have 4 or 5 elements per list. Sorted by [1]
marker_array = [
    ['hard','00:01','soft','tall','round'],
    ['heavy','00:01','light','skinny','bouncy'],
    ['rock','00:01','feather','tree','ball'],
    ['fast','00:35','pidgeon','random'],
    ['turtle','00:40','wet','flat','tail']]  

from collections import defaultdict
d1= defaultdict(list)
d2= defaultdict(list)
d3= defaultdict(list)
d4= defaultdict(list)

# Surpress IndexError due to 4 element list.
# Add + ' ' because ' '.join(d2[x])... create spaces between words.
try:
    for pxa in marker_array:
        d1[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[:1])
        d2[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[2] + ' ')
        d3[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[3] + ' ')
        d4[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[4] + ' ')

except IndexError:
    pass

# Combine all the pieces.
res = [[' '.join(d1[x]),
        x,
        ''.join(d2[x]),
        ''.join(d3[x]),
        ''.join(d4[x])]
        for x in sorted(d1)]

# Remove empty elements.
for p in res:
    if not p[-1]:
        p.pop()

print res

The output is almost what I need:

[['hard heavy rock', '00:01', 'soft light feather ', 'tall skinny tree ', 'round bouncy ball '], ['fast', '00:35', 'pidgeon ', 'random ']]

This scaled up version has certainly lost some of the original elegance due to my skill level. Any general pointers on improving this code are much appreciated, but my two main questions in order of importance are:

  1. How can I make sure that the ['turtle','00:40','wet','flat','tail'] nested list is not ignored?
  2. What can I do to avoid trailing white space as in 'soft light feather '?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is the placement of your try block. The IndexError isn't being caused by the defaultdict, it is because you're trying to access pxa[4] in the 4th row of marker_array, which doesn't exist.

Move your try / except inside the for loop, like this:

for pxa in marker_array:
  try:
    d1[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[:1])
    d2[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[2] + ' ')
    d3[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[3] + ' ')
    d4[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[4] + ' ')
  except IndexError:
    pass

Output will now include the 4th row.

To answer your second question, you can remove the whitespace by surrounding your various ''.join() calls with a strip() or rstrip() call on each join (e.g. strip(''.join(d2[x])).

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  1. Because your try statement starts outside the for loop, an exception in the for loop causes the program to go to the except block and not return to the loop afterwards. Instead, put the try before the main block inside the loop:

    for pxa in marker_array:
        try:
            d1[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[:1])
            d2[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[2] + ' ')
            d3[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[3] + ' ')
            d4[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[4] + ' ')
    
        except IndexError:
            pass
    

    Technically it's best practice to include as little code as possible inside the try block, so if you're sure that lists will never have fewer than 4 items, you can move the start of the try block down to the line immediately before you extend d4.

  2. If I understand your code correctly, you're getting the trailing white space because your adding a space after pxa[4]. Of course, removing the space in d4[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[4] + ' ') such that it's d4[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[4]) won't solve your problem for the shorter lists. Instead, you can not add a space after pxa[3] and instead add one before pxa[4], like this:

            d3[pxa[1]].extend(pxa[3])
            d4[pxa[1]].extend(' ' + pxa[4])
    

I think that should fix it.

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