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This scenario always occurs frequently: We have some threads, and a shared object, we need to make sure at any time only one thread can modify that object.

Well, the obvious solution is to use the lock the door-do the job-get out of there idiom. In this situation, I always use POSIX mutexes. For example

pthread_mutex_lock(&this->messageRW);     // lock the door
P_Message x = this->messageQueue.front(); // do the job
this->messageQueue.pop(); 
pthread_mutex_unlock(&this->messageRW);   // get out of there
// somewhere else, in another thread
while (true) {
    P_Message message;
    solver->listener->recvMessage(message);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&(solver->messageRW));     // lock the door
    solver->messageQueue.push(message);           // do the job
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&(solver->messageRW));   // get out of there
    sem_post(&solver->messageCount);
}

I use messageQueue in so many places in code. So ended up with a lot of lock/unlock pairs which are inelegant. I think there should be a way to declare messageQueue as an object that is supposed to be shared between threads, and then threading API can take care of lock/unlock. I can think of a wrapper class, or something similar. A POSIX-based solution is preferred though other API's (boost threads, or other libraries) are also acceptable.

What would you implement in a similar situation?

Update for future readers

I found this. Will be a part of C++14 I guess.

share|improve this question
4  
Why not create a class containing a mutex and message queue, and expose public functions for accessing the queue and within those public functions the mutext is acquired and released. This removes the acquire/release from the client code. – hmjd Jul 3 '13 at 8:09
2  
Check e.g. std::lock_guard. – Joachim Pileborg Jul 3 '13 at 8:09
    
@hmjd Yes. That's the "wrapper class way" I mentioned in question – sorush-r Jul 3 '13 at 8:15
1  
Combine the method suggested by @hmjd, with the scoped lock guards, and you have a good solution. – Joachim Pileborg Jul 3 '13 at 8:20
2  
It sounds like you want a concurrent queue. There are plenty of examples of that out there in the interwebs. – juanchopanza Jul 3 '13 at 8:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use boost:scoped_lock in this case. As soon as you go out of scope, it unlocks elegantly:

 boost::mutex mMutex;//member mutex object defined somewhere


{ //scope operator start
   boost::mutex::scoped_lock scopedLock(mMutex);
   pthread_mutex_lock();     // scoped lock the door
   P_Message x = this->messageQueue.front(); // do the job
   this->messageQueue.pop(); 
} //scope operator end, unlock mutex

// somewhere else, in another thread
while (true) {
    P_Message message;
    solver->listener->recvMessage(message);
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock scopedLock(mMutex);     // scoped lock the door
    solver->messageQueue.push(message);           // do the job
    sem_post(&solver->messageCount);
} //scope operator end, unlock mutex
share|improve this answer
    
What if scope is same? For example we need to access shared data in a scope, do some other staff, again check the data. Do we have deadlocks then? – sorush-r Jul 3 '13 at 8:14
1  
@soroush, wherever you want to use scope_lock you can wrap with curly brackets{ } for scope control – AngelinaJolly Jul 3 '13 at 8:18

For this I would either subclass (is-a) or include (has-a) the message queue class into another class which forced the use of mutexes.

That's functionally what other languages do such as with the Java synchronized keyword - it modifieds the underlying object to be automatically protected.

share|improve this answer

It's the message queue itself which should handle the locking (be atomic), not the calling code. And you need more than just a mutex, you need a condition as well to avoid race conditions. The standard idiom would be something like:

class ScopedLock    //  You should already have this one anyway
{
    pthread_mutex_t& myOwned;
    ScopedLock( ScopedLock const& );
    ScopedLock& operator=( ScopedLock const& );
public:
    ScopedLock( pthread_mutex_t& owned )
        : myOwned( owned )
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock( &myOwned );
    }
    ~ScopedLock()
    {
        pthread_mutex_unlock( &myOwned );
    }
};

class MessageQueue
{
    std::deque<Message> myQueue;
    pthread_mutex_t myMutex;
    pthread_cond_t myCond;
public:
    MessageQueue()
    {
        pthread_mutex_init( &myMutex );
        pthread_cond_init( &myCond );
    }
    void push( Message const& message )
    {
        ScopedLock( myMutex );
        myQueue.push_back( message );
        pthread_cond_broadcast( &myCond );
    }

    Message pop()
    {
        ScopedLock( myMutex );
        while ( myQueue.empty() ) {
            pthread_cond_wait( &myCond, &myMutex );
        }
        Message results = myQueue.front();
        myQueue.pop_front();
        return results;
    }
};

This needs more error handling, but the basic structure is there.

Of course, if you can use C++11, you'ld be better off using the standard thread primitives. (Otherwise, I'd normally suggest Boost threads. But if you're already using Posix threads, you might want to wait to convert until you can use standard threads, rather than converting twice.) But you'll still need both a mutex and a condition.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP is using a semaphore to manage the queue. – Martin James Jul 3 '13 at 15:16
    
@MartinJames That's doing things the hard way (and he didn't post the code where he synchronizes on it in the read). – James Kanze Jul 3 '13 at 15:25
    
Yes, but there seems little point in the sem_post unless the read is doing a sem_wait. – Martin James Jul 4 '13 at 1:39
    
@MartinJames Agreed. It was, in fact, looking at the read, and the absence of any synchronization, that led to my answer. – James Kanze Jul 4 '13 at 7:57

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