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If you have worked with JavaScript at any length you are aware that Internet Explorer does not implement the ECMAScript function for Array.prototype.indexOf() [including Internet Explorer 8]. It is not a huge problem, because you can extend the functionality on your page with the following code.

Array.prototype.indexOf = function(obj, start) {
     for (var i = (start || 0), j = this.length; i < j; i++) {
         if (this[i] === obj) { return i; }
     }
     return -1;
}

When should I implement this?

Should I wrap it on all my pages with the following check, which checks if the prototype function exists and if not, go ahead and extend the Array prototype?

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {

    // Implement function here

}

Or do browser check and if it is Internet Explorer then just implement it?

//Pseudo-code

if (browser == IE Style Browser) {

     // Implement function here

}
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Actually Array.prototype.indexOf is not part of ECMA-262/ECMAScript. See ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/ECMA-262.pdf Maybe you're thinking String.prototype.indexOf... –  Crescent Fresh Nov 16 '09 at 19:39
4  
It's an extension, not part of the original standard. It should, however, be implemented as part of Javascript 1.6 (which IE fails to do) developer.mozilla.org/en/New_in_JavaScript_1.6 –  Josh Stodola Nov 16 '09 at 19:41
1  
@Josh: was just referring to "IE does not implement the ECMAScript function..." –  Crescent Fresh Nov 16 '09 at 19:48
3  
Your implementation of Array.indexOf doesn't take negative starting indices into account. See Mozilla's suggestion stop-gap implementation here: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  nickf Oct 27 '10 at 15:44
2  
I've updated the question to use "===", because I'm worried people will copy it with the "==" and that would be wrong - other than that it's fine. See Eli Grey's answer. –  joshcomley Apr 15 '11 at 19:25
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8 Answers

up vote 154 down vote accepted

Do it like this...

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {

}

As recommended compatibility by MDC.

In general, browser detection code is a big no-no.

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I don't have enough rep to edit the question but feel free to remove the ECMAScript lingo and replace with the appropriate wording. Thanks Again –  Bobby Borszich Nov 16 '09 at 19:47
9  
Be careful if you use this kind of detection. Another library might implement this function before you test it, and it might not be standards compliant (prototype has done it a while ago). If I were working in a hostile environment (lots of other coders using lots of distinct libraries), I wouldn't trust any of these... –  Pablo Cabrera Nov 17 '09 at 11:38
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Alternatively, you could use the jQuery 1.2 inArray function, which should work across browsers:

jQuery.inArray( value, array [, fromIndex ] )
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3  
Thanks for the answer .It works Great :) –  naveen Jul 28 '11 at 13:57
    
The 'indexOf' is native code (right), so will the jQuery 'inArray()' be as fast, such as use native when available and poly-fill when not? –  Jeach Mar 7 '13 at 17:12
4  
Ok so to answer my own comment (above), I just implemented it and on Chrome it's as fast as when I was using 'indexOf()', but in IE 8 it is very, very slow... so at least we know that 'inArray()' uses native when it can. –  Jeach Mar 7 '13 at 17:22
    
This is Perfect! –  Mobeen Aug 1 '13 at 7:46
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The full code then would be this:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function(obj, start) {
         for (var i = (start || 0), j = this.length; i < j; i++) {
             if (this[i] === obj) { return i; }
         }
         return -1;
    }
}

For a really thorough answer and code to this as well as other array functions check out Stack Overflow question Fixing JavaScript Array functions in Internet Explorer (indexOf, forEach, etc.).

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The underscore.js library has an indexOf function you can use instead:

_.indexOf([1, 2, 3], 2)
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3  
This answer avoids messing with the array prototype, and it delegates to the native indexOf when available. I like it. –  Brad Koch Oct 18 '12 at 20:08
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You should check if it's not defined using if (!Array.prototype.indexOf).

Also, your implementation of indexOf is not correct. You must use === instead of == in your if (this[i] == obj) statement, otherwise [4,"5"].indexOf(5) would be 1 according to your implementation, which is incorrect.

I recommend you use the implementation on MDC.

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1  
Actually, it would be 1... –  Pablo Cabrera Nov 17 '09 at 11:39
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I would recommend this to anyone looking for missing functionality:

http://code.google.com/p/ddr-ecma5/

It brings in most of the missing ecma5 functionality to older browers :)

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** Although I will note that I have had problems in IE7 with this lib. –  Josh Mc Jun 14 '12 at 5:34
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This was my implementation. Essentially, add this before any other scripts on the page. i.e. in your master for a global solution for Internet Explorer 8. I also added in the trim function which seems to be used in allot of frameworks.

<!--[if lte IE 8]>
<script>
    if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
        Array.prototype.indexOf = function(obj, start) {
            for (var i = (start || 0), j = this.length; i < j; i++) {
                if (this[i] === obj) {
                    return i;
                }
            }
            return -1;
        };
    }

    if(typeof String.prototype.trim !== 'function') {
        String.prototype.trim = function() {
            return this.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g, '');
        };
    };
</script>
<![endif]-->
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I believe you could do this:

Array.prototype.indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf || function(obj, start) {
    for (var i = (start || 0), j = this.length; i < j; i++) {
        if (this[i] === obj) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
};
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