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Well i may sound very naive .Please forgive me.But i cannot understand a simple scenario.

Following is a code

class Utils {
    int getInt(String x) throws Exception {
        return 7;
    }
}

public class Tutorial4 extends Utils  {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Utils u = new Tutorial4();
        u.getInt("2");

    }

    int getInt(String arg) {
        return Integer.parseInt(arg);
    }
}

But the following code shows me compile time error at

u.getInt("2");

It asks me to declare or handle the exception.

However when I am overridding the above method then why it is showing the error

and secondly when i give NUllPointerException in place of Exception it gives me no error

What is the concept behind it?

Thanks

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No question is stupid at all... everyone is a beginner at some point of time. Feel free to ask questions but make sure they follow SO guidelines. Everyone will help here :) –  Prasad Kharkar Jul 3 '13 at 9:03
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It asks me to declare or handle the exception.

Yeah right. When you invoke a method that has declared an exception to be thrown, the calling method should either also declare that exception to be thrown, or handle that exception.

However when I am overridding the above method then why it is showing the error

You cannot remove or decrease the restriction while overriding a method. Your overriding method must declare at least the exception or it's subclass that is being declared in the overridden method.

secondly when i give NUllPointerException in place of Exception it gives me no error

NPE is an Unchecked exception, so it is not needed to declare it to be thrown.

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However when I am overridding the above method then why it is showing the error

Thats because the type of your variable u is Utils. And in Utils the method getInt() throws an Exception which is Checked Exception

Changed the declaration as

Tutorial4 u = new Tutorial4();
u.getInt();

Here you dont have to handle the Exception because, while overriding, you have removed the throws Exception clause from getInt() definition

and secondly when i give NUllPointerException in place of Exception it gives me no error

Because NullPointerException is an Unchecked Exception. And If any method throws an Unchecked exception, the caller is not mandated to catch the exception.

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Take a look at this link: http://www.artima.com/designtechniques/exceptions.html It is quite a easy to understand description of the exception concept.

But the following code shows me compile time error at It asks me to declare or handle the exception.

You have declared that an Exception is throwed by that method. By overriding you mean inhe riting, so you also inherit the throws declaration and therefore you also get the compilation error.

and secondly when i give NUllPointerException in place of Exception it gives me no error

This is because NullPointerException is a RuntimeException, that is not marked as error during compilation. See the little inheritance diagramm in the link above.

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public static void main(String[] args)  throws Exception{
        Utils u = new Tutorial4();
        u.getInt("2");

    }
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secondly when i give NUllPointerException in place of Exception it gives me no error

this is because NPE in unchecked exception.

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Also, when you are writing main method, better to handle exception in it.

 public static void main(String[] args) {

        try{


        }catch(Exception e){
           //do something with the exception here.
        }


    }

Because of you declare throws for main method also, your program will break in main method

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