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Given Msdn : A constant-expression is an expression that can be fully evaluated at compile-time.

However in the sample code below, I have a contantExpression that can't be evaluated at compile-time.

I should have missed something, but what ?

public class SomeClass
{
    public string Key { get; set; }
}

public static void Sample()
{
    var wantedKey = Console.ReadLine();
    Expression<Func<SomeClass, bool>> expression = c => c.Key == wantedKey;

    var maybeAConstantExpression = ((MemberExpression)((BinaryExpression)expression.Body).Right).Expression;

    //Both are true, so we have a constantExpression,righ and Value should be known
    Console.WriteLine(maybeAConstantExpression.NodeType == ExpressionType.Constant);
    Console.WriteLine(maybeAConstantExpression.GetType() == typeof(ConstantExpression));

    var constantExpression = ((ConstantExpression)maybeAConstantExpression);
    var constantValue = constantExpression.Value;

    //ConsoleApplication1.Program+<>c__DisplayClass0
    //Do not looks like a constant..this is a class...
    Console.WriteLine(constantValue);

    var fakeConstantValue = constantValue.GetType().GetField("wantedKey").GetValue(constantValue);
    //Return the value entered whith Console.ReadLine
    //This is not really known at compile time...
    Console.WriteLine(fakeConstantValue);
}
share|improve this question
    
To be a constant expression, your 'maybeAConstantExpression' should hold a constant value, but it is not, it is relying on the console read line in the runtime; so your constantExpression will not be evaluated in the compile time. –  Jegan Jul 3 '13 at 9:13
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A const is something that can be evaluated at compile-time. a ConstantExpression merely represents a fixed value. That could have come from compile-time, but it is not required to, and often isn't.

There is a difference between a constant expression (in the C# language sense) and a ConstantExpression (runtime object).

The constantValue in your case represents the capture-context - the silent class that hoists wantedKey. Basically, that code is (via the compiler):

class HorribleNameThatYouCannotSay {
    public string wantedKey; // yes, a public field
}
...
static void Sample()
{
    var ctx = new HorribleNameThatYouCannotSay();
    ctx.wantedKey = Console.ReadLine();
    var p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(SomeClass), "c");
    Expression<Func<SomeClass, bool>> expression =
        Expression.Lambda<Func<SomeClass, bool>>(
            Expression.Equal(
                Expression.PropertyOrField(p, "Key"),
                Expression.PropertyOrField(
                    Expression.Constant(ctx), "wantedKey")
                ), p);
    );
}

or something very close

but it could just be:

string wantedKey = Console.ReadLine();
var p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(SomeClass), "c");
Expression<Func<SomeClass, bool>> expression =
    Expression.Lambda<Func<SomeClass, bool>>(
        Expression.Equal(
            Expression.PropertyOrField(p, "Key"),
            Expression.Constant(wantedKey, typeof(string))
            ), p);

if you write it manually with the Expresion API (i.e. like the above)

share|improve this answer
    
So in your first code sample, how Expression.Constant(ctx) can be a Constant ? This an instance of HorribleNameThatYouCannotSay, no ? –  Toto Jul 3 '13 at 12:16
    
@Toto again, I explicitly said that it was not a "constant" in the language sense. It is a constant in the Expression sense, in that it represents a fixed value (as opposed to a parameter etc); but that fixed value is provided at runtime. Expression is a runtime API. –  Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:23
    
@Toto to be clear - in the first example all I have done is written the line Expression<Func<SomeClass, bool>> expression = c => c.Key == wantedKey;, but in the way that the compiler does it –  Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:24
    
Ok, thx. No sure to have complity assimilated the response, I certainly need to take Expression 101 again :) –  Toto Jul 3 '13 at 12:30
    
@Toto but yes, it is a reference to an instance of HorribleNameThatYouCannotSay - or as the compiler called it, <>c__DisplayClass0 - simply: I can't put that in an example because it won't compile –  Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:35
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