Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am working with RAW sockets on Linux/Debian and I have a problem when I use write() instead of sendto():

struct sockaddr_ll socket_address;
/* Index of the network device */
socket_address.sll_ifindex = if_idx.ifr_ifindex;
/* Address length*/
socket_address.sll_halen = ETH_ALEN;
/* Destination MAC */
socket_address.sll_addr[0] = 0x00;
socket_address.sll_addr[1] = 0x11;
socket_address.sll_addr[2] = 0x22;
socket_address.sll_addr[3] = 0x33;
socket_address.sll_addr[4] = 0x44;
socket_address.sll_addr[5] = 0x55;

/* Send packet */
int b_written = 0;

if ( ( b_written = write(sockfd, sendbuf, tx_len,
                                   (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address,
                                    sizeof(struct sockaddr_ll))) < 0 )
/*
if ( ( b_written = sendto(sockfd, sendbuf, tx_len, 0,
                                   (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address,
                    sizeof(struct sockaddr_ll))) < 0 )
*/
{
    perror("Could not write socket...");
    fprintf(stderr, "ERRNO = %d\n", errno);
    exit(-1);
}
printf("Packet sent!, Bytes written = %d\n", b_written);

If I use "write" instead of sendto, I get the following perror: "No such device or address" (errno=6, which is defined as EXNIO).

Using "sendto" I have no problem and packet is shown in "tcpdump -nettti eth0 '(ether dst host 00:11:22:33:44:55)'".

In accordance with man(sendto), sendto is equivalent to a write without specifying any flags. Since the flags field that I use for "sendto" is '0', I guess that both system calls are equivalent.

What migh I be doing wrong? Is it correct that both calls are equivalent?

share|improve this question
    
write() can't have 5 parameters. – nouney Jul 3 '13 at 11:01
    
As for the contents of that manpage, it seems that the only differences between sendto() and sendmsg() are how to pass the arguments to those functions. Why should it be more appropriate to use "sendmsg()" than "sendto()" for a link layer level RAW socket? – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 11:37
    
Is this the original code. Did you mean write or send. What nouney said is right, i think. If it is send, then you cannot use it for connectionless service eg: SOCK_RAW – Aravind Jul 3 '13 at 11:39
    
As you can see in the code, my issue is between the usage of "write" and "sendto". I started using "write" since the socket is connectionless; however, after getting the EXNIO error, I started using "sendto()" since I think that it does not require a connection to be established before sending data. In my case, the latter ("sendto()") is working fine and I can even see the packet with tcpdump. – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 11:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The sendto() call may be used only when the socket is in a connected state (so that the intended recipient is known). Following is the prototype of write function and it has 3 parameters not 5 like send() function.

write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t count);

share|improve this answer
    
Even with 3 arguments, I get the same errno #6 (EXNIO: "No such device or address"). The call to write is as follows: write(sockfd, sendbuf, tx_len). – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 11:32
    
A newer question that comes to my mind is: if in accordance with "write"'s manpage, this function has 3 arguments, why can I compile and execute my code passing 5 arguments to "write"? Does it support multiple arguments and ignores those that it does not need? Shouldn't GCC warn me (at least) about this issue? – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 11:34
1  
@Ricardo No it don't support multiple arguments. What's your compiler option ? Did you compile with -Wall ? – nouney Jul 3 '13 at 11:36
2  
@Ricardo if you include unistd.h, gcc will tell you that you don't use it correctly. – nouney Jul 3 '13 at 12:56
1  
@nouney , OK, thanks for the explanation... I would never have thought that GCC would trust somebody like me... :) – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 13:15

You have to bind() (see manual) the address to your socket, then use write() correctly (That means, with only 3 parameters).

/* Send packet */
int b_written = 0;

if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address, sizeof(struct sockaddr_ll)) == -1)
{
    perror("bind");
    exit(-1);
}
if ( ( b_written = write(sockfd, sendbuf, tx_len)) < 0 )
{
    perror("Could not write socket...");
    fprintf(stderr, "ERRNO = %d\n", errno);
    exit(-1);
}
printf("Packet sent!, Bytes written = %d\n", b_written);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this solves the problem. Thank you @nouney! Please find the full solution in my answer below since it is important to fill up certain fields of the sockaddr_ll structure. – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 12:48

This message results from I/O to a special file's subdevice that either does not exist or that exists beyond the limit of the device. So check, Do you have permission or access to write where you want to perform write operation. Also change write parameters as it can have only three parameters.

from man page

int write(fd, buf, nbyte)

I hope this solve the issue.

share|improve this answer
1  
why would he get an error for write but not sendto if it's a permission error? – xaxxon Jul 3 '13 at 11:19
    
Right now, I am executing that application as <root>, since I also need privileges for opening the socket; so I guess that it is not a permissions issue. – Ricardo Jul 3 '13 at 11:23
    
@Ricardo... I said that because you are getting errno=6, which means device not present. if you have that device physically(as I assumed), then there is only one problem. So check the device file. The permissions must read 666 (crw-rw-rw-). – someone Jul 3 '13 at 11:29
    
@Krishna he said he sees the data in tcpdump, so the device clearly exists and he has permissions. – xaxxon Jul 3 '13 at 11:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.