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On our system, which is implemented by a web role that uses a database sql-azure, we are experiencing recurring timeout on a specific query.

These timeouts occur for a few hours during the day and then do not show up anymore.

The query has two tables with a number of rows is not very high (about 800,000 rows) with joins using primary keys.

The execution plan is ok, the indexes are used properly, the query normally takes two seconds to be performed.

Tests without EntityFramework give the same result.

Transient fault handling are not applicable in the case of timeout.

What can be the cause of this behavior?

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What is your timeout setting? Did you try with a higher timeout? And is the timeout related to establishing a connection, or running the query? If your query is CPU intensive, or if SQL Azure is busy, SQL Azure could be slowing your execution (CPU throttling). – Herve Roggero Jul 3 '13 at 15:54
    
Querying the sys.event_log table can help find evidence of throttling or connectivity issues. – Mike Asdf Jul 3 '13 at 20:13
    
Thank you, usually I use the default timeout, I tried with a higher timeout and had no effect. The timeout is relative to the execution of the query. In view sys.event_log there are no log entries about the timeout. – Francesco Jul 12 '13 at 9:18
1  
This just highlights one of the issues with SQL Azure database, you get a database on an instance. There are other databases running on that instance. You are sharing resources (mem/cpu/storage/network), if other users of user databases on that instance are being bad neighbours, there is not much you can do. – MarkPm Jul 12 '13 at 10:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

We have experienced similar issues in the past using SQL Azure; frequently queries running against tables with less that 10 rows and even the standard .Net membership provider queries, all failed intermittently with timeouts. This is usually when we have little to no activity on our service; mostly at night.

In commonly used areas where it is safe to retry on SQL Timeout (Usually read operations) we have added the timeout exception to our custom error detection strategy, taken from the Transient Fault Handling Block; however as you stated this is not appropriate in most cases.

The best explanation we have received from Azure support thus far is that as SQL Azure is really a shared SQL Server instance that is used by multiple clients; if one user performs an intensive operation it can affect other users in this way. However; believe this not to be acceptable we are still in contact with SQL Azure support to ascertain why throttling is not stopping this sort of activity from affecting us.

You best bet is to:

  • Contact SQL Azure Support either through the forums or directly (If you have a support package)
  • If possible; try setting up a new SQL Azure instance and migrating your database across
    • Whilst we get this issue intermittently on one SQL Azure instance; we have never experienced it on our other 2 instances.

As a side note; we are still waiting on Azure Support to get back to us regarding why we were still receiving timeout exceptions.

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1  
An update to this; SQL Azure has moved on substantially since I wrote this and I believe they have measures in place stopping customers affecting each other across shared instances. There are also Premium dedicated servers if you want more bang for your buck. As of April 2015 (last time I used SQL Azure professionally) we no longer received these intermittent time out issues. – Luke Merrett Nov 5 '15 at 11:08

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