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Never used LINQ within C# before until 30 mins ago and am struggling to find an answer to my query online (probably due to my lack of understanding).

I have a simple query

var variableName = from a in tableName.AsEnumerable()
    where a.column1 == item1
        && a.column2 == item2
        && a.column3 != null
    select a;

The SQL column is defined as an int, null.

When the code encounters a record that is null on the database for column3, the following error is generated "the value for column3 in table <tableName> is DBNull".

Instead of checking for != null, i guess i should be using something else, but have attempted checking for DBNull.Value but the compiler states "Operation != cannot be applied to operands of type int and system.DBNull".

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
type of that column in db ? – Ashok Damani Jul 3 '13 at 12:09
    
Try changing the type of a.column3 to the Nullable int? – Janes Abou Chleih Jul 3 '13 at 12:10
    
what is tableName and column3 here? is this a typed data-set for example? or...? – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:10
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This looks like a typed dataset, which : yeuch - stop using those, but I digress.

As such, accessing a.column3 will always raise an exception if that value is DBNull. You would need to use the typed-dataset pattern:

&& !c.Iscolumn3Null()
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this seems to work. I can successfully retrieve null and not null values. Thank you very much. – Giraffe Jul 3 '13 at 14:33
    
@Giraffe k, but please - for the love of all code, please please consider moving away from typed data-sets. Pretty please. – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 14:34
    
@Giraffe I just saw your comment to Marcin - indeed, if you are just changing one thing, then sure - maintain the existing code-base. But when doing something new, at least consider using a different tech ;p – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 14:37

tableName.AsEnumerable() makes the query in-memory, so all table rows are downloaded from DB and the conditions are checked on application.

Try that:

var variableName = from a in tableName
                   where a.column1 == item1
                       && a.column2 == item2
                       && a.column3 != null
                   select a;

It should be translated into an SQL query and download only necessary rows.

share|improve this answer
1  
to me, this "query" actually looks like a typed dataset, in which case this simply doesn't apply – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:19
    
Yes this is a typed dataset. It's also code that's already in Production and this is a minor change, so I am not permitted to make any changes to the SQL table or to change the fundamental structure i.e. I have to use the LINQ code that is already present and just add the one line to check for != null. – Giraffe Jul 3 '13 at 13:07

Try this..

var variableName = from a in tableName.AsEnumerable()
    where a.column1 == item1
        && a.column2 == item2
        && a.column3 != dbnull.value
    select a;
share|improve this answer
    
please see my reply to mckeejm - I strongly suspect that this error is happening inside the a.column3 member-access, so it won't matter what we compare it to, since it won't ever get that far – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:47
    
As stated in my first post, this generates "Operation != cannot be applied to operands of type int and system.DBNull". – Giraffe Jul 3 '13 at 12:59
    
i am taking deep drive into this scenario. – user1812171 Jul 3 '13 at 13:08

try

var variableName = from a in tableName.AsEnumerable()
    where a.column1 == item1
        && a.column2 == item2
        && !DBNull.Value.Equals(a.column3)
    select a;

edit apparently I need to read up on typed data sets :) and why I should never use them

share|improve this answer
1  
since accessing a.column3 seems to have caused this error, I really doubt that will help – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:13
1  
I agree with @MarcGravell – Janes Abou Chleih Jul 3 '13 at 12:15
    
I only saw that the type mismatch was causing the issue... how do we know that simply accessing column3 is the error? from the doc: "To evaluate database fields to determine whether their values are DBNull, you can pass the field value to the DBNull.Value.Equals method. However, this method is rarely used because there are a number of other ways to evaluate a database field for missing data. These include the Visual Basic IsDBNull function, the Convert.IsDBNull method, the DataTableReader.IsDBNull method, the IDataRecord.IsDBNull method, and several other methods." – mckeejm Jul 3 '13 at 12:18
1  
@mckeejm regular comparisons would not be specific about the column name, because that context is lost once the value is fetched; thus, the exception must be coming from inside the access to a.column3 - which strongly suggests to me that this is a "typed dataset" – Marc Gravell Jul 3 '13 at 12:21
1  
Yes, "&& !DBNull.Value.Equals(a.column3)" still generates the error "The value for column <name> in table <name> is DBNull." Am just going to try Marc's suggestion now "&& !c.Iscolumn3Null()". – Giraffe Jul 3 '13 at 13:37

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