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I was learning C# and I read about an interface called IDisposable with the only method Dispose() calling it by using the using syntac. If I use the following:

Class b=new Class();
using(b)
{
//statements
}

using (Class o=new Class())
{
//statements
}

What will happen if I try to use the objects b and o after the braces have ended in both the cases?

share|improve this question
    
With some luck, usually available, you'll be slapped with an ObjectDisposedException to remind you that you did it wrong. – Hans Passant Jul 3 '13 at 13:37
    
Why not try it and find out. The second example is the easy one to test, the first can vary a bit between classes, but you should get a basic idea with just a handful of tests. – Servy Jul 3 '13 at 13:43

b will still be in scope and not null, but most well implemented classes that dispose should throw an exception if you try to use them after they have had Dispose called (thus stopping you from using it further).

It will compile and may still be usable - it entirely depends on how it has been implemented internally. However, you shouldn't use it as it's state is not guaranteed and creates confusing code.

o will be out of scope and won't compile.

All the using statement does is cause the compiler to emit some try-catch statements and call Dispose on the wrapped object. It does nothing else.

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if you need the object later, you dont have to use the using block. its recommended to use it but in some cases you can use the following structure:

class b = null;
try
{
  b = new class();

  /* ... do your stuff ... */

}
catch (Exception)
{
  /* handle errors */  
  throw;
}
finally
{
  if (b != null)
  {
    b.Dispose();
    b = null;
  }            
}

this way b will be disposed at the end of your method if exists.

you are also allowed to have a using block inside a using block:

using (Class a=new Class())
{
  /* you can access a here */
  using (Class b=new Class())
  {
    /* you can access a and b here  */
  }
}
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