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The task is to find all continuous subsets or better say subarrays with a particular sum where the subset can contain both positive and negative integers Example: For subset={1,-1,1,-1,1} all those subsets resulting in sum 1 are:

{1}
{1,-1,1}
{1}
{1,-1,1,-1,1}
{1,-1,1}
{1}

which means there are 6 subsets with sum 1...i have tried it by saving previous sums but still i am only possible to do it using 2 loops..one from 0 to n and other from 0 to i-1 here is the code:

  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
  {
      scanf("%d", &a1[i]); 
      sum[i] = a1[i] + a1[i - 1];
  }

  sum[0] = INT_MAX;
  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
  {
      if (a1[i] == 1 || a1[i] == -1)
      {
          count++;
      }

      if (i > 0)
      {
          if (sum[i] == 1 || sum[i] == -1)
          {
              count++;
          }

          for (j = 0; j < i - 1; j++)
          {
              if ((sum[i - 1 - j] + a1[i] == 1) || (sum[i - 1 - j] + a1[i]) == -1)
              {
                  count++;
              }

              sum[i - 1 - j] += a1[i];
          }
      }
  }

Is there a way possible to do it in O(n) or O(nlogn) time complexity?

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2  
Could you correctly indent that code so it's readable? –  sedavidw Jul 3 '13 at 13:47
1  
There is nothing sort of python problem..but i thought that maybe we needed to use hash tables kind of stuff and maybe users have a better way of doing in python..I just want the method with complexity O(n) or O(nlogn)..language doesn't matters..and sorry for formatting problems..this is my 1st question here so had no idea.. –  user2546794 Jul 3 '13 at 14:30
2  
I think that there's likely no feasible way to check O(n^2) possible partial sums in anything less than O(n^2) time... –  twalberg Jul 3 '13 at 15:08

2 Answers 2

No, there is no way, because there exist N-element arrays having O(N^2) slices with a given sum. Just enumerating the output takes O(N^2).

Example: the array { +1, -1, +1, -1 ... } (length N = 2k+1) with desired sum +1.

  • there are N-2 slices of length 3 summing up to +1
  • there are N-4 slices of length 5 summing up to +1
  • ... there are 3 slices of length N-2 summing up to +1
  • there are 1 slices of length N summing up to +1

Total: 1 + 3 + ... + N-2 = 2 * (1 + 2 + ... + k) - k = k^2

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As I am still not able to comment on posts...

Are we supposed to assume for a sum of +1, sets {1, -1, 1} and {-1, 1, 1} different ?

The only way of getting at a sum of +1 by using 3 elements is by the combination of +1, +1 and -1.

Now assuming the order of the elements matter, there can at most 3! = 6 sets which can add upto +1 .

If N = 2k+1, put k = 100, N = 201, I still don't see how there are N-2 = 199 subsets of length 3 with a sum of +1 unless -1 in 2nd position and -1 is another position are in the original set are treated as different -1's

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I doubt it's a good idea to post an answer instead of a comment! It seems, from the examples the OP gave, he meant "slices", not "distinct slices", and certainly not "sets" or "distinct sets" (see {1} multiple times, as well as the non-set {1, -1, 1}). –  dan3 Sep 12 '13 at 17:08
    
Sorry for posting a comment as an answer as I do not yet have enough reputation to comment. –  Vivek S Sep 12 '13 at 17:15
    
Yeah, that probably means you should act so as to gain reputation points. By breaking the rules you will probably lose reputation. Good luck. –  dan3 Sep 12 '13 at 17:16

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