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Can anyone provide a real life senario where Type Forward is use?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The BCL libraries commonly use the TypeForwardedTo attribute when different versions of the framework move a type between assemblies. For example, the Func<> style delegates were moved from System.Core in the 3.5 framework to mscorlib in the 4.0 framework.

You can view real world uses of this by opening System.Core.dll from 4.0 in ildasm, double clicking on the Manifest node and looking for all of the lines similar to the following

.class extern forwarder System.Func`1
{
  .assembly extern mscorlib
}
.class extern forwarder System.Func`2
{
  .assembly extern mscorlib
}
.class extern forwarder System.Func`3
{
  .assembly extern mscorlib
}
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1  
Excellent example. Now if only the WCF resolver would respect TypeForwardedToAttribute ;-p –  Marc Gravell Nov 16 '09 at 22:07

From msdn:

For example, suppose an application uses the Example class in an assembly named Utility.dll. The developers of Utility.dll might decide to refactor the assembly, and in the process they might move the Example class to another assembly. If the old version of Utility.dll is replaced by the new version of Utility.dll and its companion assembly, the application that uses the Example class fails because it cannot locate the Example class in the new version of Utility.dll.

The developers of Utility.dll can avoid this by forwarding requests for the Example class, using the TypeForwardedToAttribute attribute. If the attribute has been applied to the new version of Utility.dll, requests for the Example class are forwarded to the assembly that now contains the class. The existing application continues to function normally, without recompilation.

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In general it seems to allow for more flexibility/refactoring ability in your library classes. I found the article on MSDN blogs helpful. In that article one of the examples shows an existing library being split into 2 seperate DLLs where app that used the libraries would not have to care that a type was moved to a different dll in newer versions of the dll thanks to type forwarding.

MSDN Blog Posting: Type Forwarding

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