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When i am using the null character '\u0000', stringbuilder will stop appending new elements.

For example:

StringBuilder _stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
_stringBuilder.append('\u0000');
_stringBuilder.append('a');
System.out.println("."+_stringBuilder+".");

returns

. 

I understand that the null value should not be printed (or printed like if it was a null String value) but in this case, why does stringbuilder is failing to add more elements ?

Note: I am using jdk 1.6.0_38 on ubuntu.

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'\0' - null terminator, used as end of string in C and C++ strings –  user1516873 Jul 3 '13 at 13:57
1  
I doubt that StringBuilder has stopped appending new elements. This is more likely an issue in displaying the resulting String. What is the length() of the StringBuilder after appending a few elements? –  Bill the Lizard Jul 3 '13 at 13:58
1  
I ran your exact code in eclipse on jdk 1.6.0_25 on Win 7 and it prints . a.... could be a shell-specific thing. –  FGreg Jul 3 '13 at 14:00
1  
I think this is OS specific as Java Strings CAN contain null characters. Win7 over here prints the same –  Brian Jul 3 '13 at 14:01
1  
prints .a. here ideone.com/BjRKT0 –  ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ Jul 3 '13 at 14:05
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The null character is a reserved character that indicates the end of the string, so if you print something followed by \u0000, nothing else after it will be printed.


Why stringbuilder stops adding elements after using the the null character? It's not really java, it is your terminal that treats \u0000 as the end of the string.

As someone says, with Windows the output can be .a. (i did not test it), this is because windows terminal works differently than Unix-based systems terminal. I'm pretty sure that if you run this code on a OSX machine you will get the same output as the one you get on linux

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2  
It prints a ., a box (for the null character), an a and a . on by windows machine. –  Bhesh Gurung Jul 3 '13 at 14:00
    
@BheshGurung I think this is because UNIX systems work differently than windows, theoretically if you try the same thing on OSX, it should print . –  BackSlash Jul 3 '13 at 14:01
2  
The null character is not used to terminate Strings in Java. –  Kayaman Jul 3 '13 at 14:02
    
@Kayaman I second this. This is an environment thing. –  Brian Jul 3 '13 at 14:02
1  
@Kayaman It's not a Java thing, it's a terminal thing. –  BackSlash Jul 3 '13 at 14:02
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Your stringBuilder still appends the elements, see:

StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
stringBuilder.append('\u0000');
System.out.println(stringBuilder.length()); // prints 1
stringBuilder.append('a');
System.out.println(stringBuilder.length()); // prints 2

My guess is that your console stops printing after the \u0000 termination character. A different console might handle that differently.

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I tried your test, and it does not fail in Eclipse on my Windows 7 system. However, running this test program will distinguish between non-appending and non-printing. I suggest running it in the failing environment.

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args){
    StringBuilder _stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    _stringBuilder.append('\u0000');
    _stringBuilder.append('a');
    System.out.println("."+_stringBuilder+".");
    System.out.println(_stringBuilder.length());
    System.out.println(_stringBuilder.charAt(1));
  } 
}

If the problem is non-appending, the length will be less than 2, and the attempt to print the character at index 1 will fail. If the problem is non-printing, the length will be 2 and the character at index 1 will be 'a'.

I think that non-printing is much more likely than non-appending.

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