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I am using a Task.FromAsync and Task.ContinueWith method to complete my work. I am using a List in my program and when I run it, it gives me an Index Out of Range Exception. However, when I go through the debugger it runs through and finishes just fine. Is there something that I am missing or does Tasks operate differently when using them with a loop and a List?

public int TimerCounter = 0;
public IList<WebsiteResult>webResult = new List<WebsiteResult>();

public void sendRequest(){
    foreach(Website web in TempVar._allWebsites)
    {
        webResult.Add(new WebSiteResult {});
        try
        {
        pageCheck(web);
        webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).RequestSentTime = DateTime.Now.ToString();
        if(webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).SystemStatus == null)
            webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).SystemStatus = "";

        TimeCounter++;
    }
}



public void pageCheck(){
    IAsyncResult asyncResult;
    Uri uri = new Uri(TempURL); //TempUrl is assigned a string beforehand
    HttpWebRequest myReq = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(uri);
    try{
        Task<WebResponse> task = Task.Factory.FromAsync(
            myReq.BeginGetResponse,
            asyncResult => myReq.EndGetResponse(asyncResult),
            (Object)null);

        task.ContinueWith(t =>
            {
                var responseCode = (HttpWebResponse)t.Result;
                ReadStreamFromResponse(t.Result);
                if(responseCode.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK){
                  webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).ResponseStatusCode = "Up"; //Error occurs here
                  reponseCode.Close();
                }
            }
        );
}
//catch exceptions
}

private String ReadStreamFromResponse(WebResponse response) {
    StreamReader responseStream = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream());
    string str = responseStream.ReadToEnd();
    return str;
}
share|improve this question
    
can you show your code.. debugger tends to have different results in regards to how things are run in release mode –  DJ KRAZE Jul 3 '13 at 13:55
    
@DJKRAZE It should be updated –  De Vonte Jul 3 '13 at 14:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because your call to pageCheck() sets up a continuation that will be run when the Task finishes/completes. However, the call to the pageCheck() method will return to the caller (sendRequest()) almost immediately after setting up and spinning off your Task. Your Task will take time to execute on a background thread pool thread, but will return control to sendRequest() quickly which then tries to access your IList which will have no elements as these are populated in the continuation. This may work sometimes depending on how the Task is dispatched by the Thread-Pool optimiser and how long the task takes. If you step through using the debugger this can effect the way the Task is fired and can effect the order of operation - so again can effect the outcome of these operations.

My advice would be to put your

task.ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        var responseCode = (HttpWebResponse)t.Result;
        ReadStreamFromResponse(t.Result);
        if(responseCode.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).ResponseStatusCode = "Up"; //Error occurs here
            reponseCode.Close();
        }

        webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).RequestSentTime = DateTime.Now.ToString();
        if(webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).SystemStatus == null)
            webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).SystemStatus = "";
        TimeCounter++;
     });

into the continuation inside pageCheck(). The other option is to create another method which wraps this process in a 'higher-level task', to you would set up your Task and the continuation in the sendRequest() method instead.

Note, using a lock in this case will not helps you as you cannot tell when the lock will be imposed. It will likely not effect the order of execution and your problem will remain.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I took that block of code and put it within the other method but it did not work. I also initialized the List with 15 entries(web urls), I ran it again and the same error came up but TimerCounter = 15(Out of bounds) and the List was on its 15th entry(Last element). –  De Vonte Jul 3 '13 at 14:40
1  
After TimeCounter is incremented to 15 it should stop right there and jump out of the loop. I will try the other option you stated. –  De Vonte Jul 3 '13 at 14:41
    
What are you doing using a timer this way (unless I have miss-understood). This does not sound right either. Yes, TimeCounter = 15 will be out-of-bounds as Lists are ZERO BASED! This means to access the 15th element you use myList[14]. –  Killercam Jul 3 '13 at 15:48
    
Yes so for the code. foreach(Website web in TempVar._allWebsites) { webResult.Add(new WebSiteResult {}); try { pageCheck(web); webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).RequestSentTime = DateTime.Now.ToString(); if(webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).SystemStatus == null) webResult.ElementAt(TimerCounter).SystemStatus = ""; TimeCounter++; } } After the loop goes through the 15th element in the list the TimeCounter is still incremented to 15 but for some reason it may be going back through giving it the exception –  De Vonte Jul 3 '13 at 15:52
    
Please see edit. Of course the TimeCounter++; should have also been in the continuation. I have edited the code above... –  Killercam Jul 3 '13 at 16:10

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