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I want to pass a method as an argument to remove repetitive code from my program. This is the functionality I would like:

 private void sqlQuery(Method sqlMethod)
{
    conn.ConnectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ApplicationServices"].ConnectionString;
    try
    {
        //open SQL connection
        conn.Open();
        sqlMethod();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write(ex.ToString());
    }
    finally
    {
        conn.Close();
    }
}

Using:

private void insertTemplate()
{
    //create SQL command
    SqlCommand insertTemplate = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO [SavedDescriptionTemplates] (SavedDescription, UserId, CreatedDate) VALUES (@descriptionParam, @userIdParam, @createdDateParam)", conn);
    //create and assign parameters
    insertTemplate.Parameters.AddWithValue("@descriptionParam", descriptionInput.Text);
    insertTemplate.Parameters.AddWithValue("@userIdParam", Int32.Parse(userNameDropDown.SelectedItem.Value));
    insertTemplate.Parameters.AddWithValue("@createdDateParam", DateTime.Now);
    //execute command and retrieve primary key from the above insert and assign to variable
    insertTemplate.ExecuteNonQuery();
}

The call would be:

sqlQuery(insertTemplate());

Is this possible?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by hometoast, musefan, Abbas, Scott Chamberlain, Henk Holterman Jul 3 '13 at 14:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
In addition to the duplicate questions, we also have Action available –  musefan Jul 3 '13 at 14:04
1  
Please consider wrapping your database code in a using block like using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString)){...} –  DOK Jul 3 '13 at 14:09
1  
Note you would be much better off defining your connection object as a local variable to sqlQuery and passing it as a parameter to your delegate, rather than making it an instance field and having other methods reference a connection that they don't know whether or not is open. Then you'll want to use the Action<SqlConnection> delegate, not Action, and have insertTemplate accept the connection as a parameter. This ensures that everywhere the connection can be accessed you know it's open. Also can be combined with DOK's comment. –  Servy Jul 3 '13 at 14:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can achieve that with a delegate.

Use for example Action:

private void sqlQuery(Action action)
{
    conn.ConnectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ApplicationServices"].ConnectionString;
    try
    {
        //open SQL connection
        conn.Open();

        action();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write(ex.ToString());
    }
    finally
    {
        conn.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Use the Action delegate.

Change

private void sqlQuery(Method sqlMethod)

into

private void sqlQuery(Action sqlMethod)

and

sqlQuery(insertTemplate());

into

sqlQuery(insertTemplate);
share|improve this answer

Yes, but slightly different...

Try this:

sqlQuery(insertTemplate); // don't CALL the method, just name it

And declare sqlQuery like this:

private void sqlQuery(Action sqlMethod)
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Look into delegates. In your case, since your method takes no parameters, you can use the built in Action delegate:

private void sqlQuery(Action sqlMethod)
{
    //...
}

sqlQuery(insertTemplate);
share|improve this answer

Blocks of logic in C# are passed as delegates. There are several ways of declaring a delegate - you can define a custom one, or use one of predefined types:

  • You can use Action<...> for delegates that do not return values, or
  • You can use Func<...,R> for delegates that return values.

Here is one way to define a function that takes a delegate:

private void sqlQuery(Action<IDbConnection> sqlMethod) {
   ...
   sqlMethod(conn);
   ...
}

Call sqlQuery with a named or an anonymous delegate which could be defined inline, as a named method, or as a lambda expression:

// Using some method that takes IDbConnection
sqlQuery(MySqlMethod);
// Using an anonymous delegate
sqlQuery((conn) => {
    ... // Do something with conn
});
share|improve this answer

Yes. You need to use delegates, anonymous functions, or lambda expressions.

Here's a simple example:

public void SomeMethod(Action<string> passedMethod)
{
    passedMethod("some string");
}

public void Caller()
{
    SomeMethod(x => Console.WriteLine(x));
}

If you run "Caller", it would output "some string".

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Delegates are the answer -> Microsoft on C# Delegates

public void delegate MyDelegate();

MyDelegate del = this.insertTemplate;

private void sqlQuery(MyDelegate sqlMethod)
{
 ...
 del();
 ...
}
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