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I am wondering where would I write my custom business logic with WCF data services (Odata).

I am new to oData, although I understand it provides quick way to query a entity but I want to do lot more (have to play with different entity). Here is a scenario, I have an existing normal WCF service it does some calculation & finally returns a list of integers.

How would I implement the same WCF service using oData.

Atul Sureka

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2 Answers

We were looking at OData for the same reasons and while there appears to be some hooks in place for doing custom processing, we too were left with the same "where does the logic go?" question. In my opinion, whatever value we would have gotten from the OData format and the WCF Data Services framework would eroded fairly quickly over time because the framework seem to demand we expose our raw data source (in our case SQL Server via NHibernate) and provides no way to do anything real-world logic-wise. This not only made it hard to see how we could move our existing RPC style SOAP services on traditional WCF to this platform, but it wasn't clear how you would use this to do anything, but vanilla CRUD. I like to say... the only real world app that's truly "just a CRUD app" is an app where SQL Server Management Studio would be an acceptable UI to your users... in other words, "just CRUD" apps don't existing.

End the end, we dumped oData and went with ServiceStack and so far we are very, very happy with it.

http://servicestack.net/

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Custom business logic can be added to OData endpoint using context-level Service methods / function imports in WCF Data Services. This allows you to create methods that return scalar values, collections or queryable collections. The code snippet is copied from JayData.org

[WebGet]
public Product[] GetCheapProducts()
{
    return this.CurrentDataSource
                        .Products
                        .OrderByDescending(p => p.Unit_Price)
                        .Take(5)
                        .ToArray();
}

[WebGet]
public IQueryable<Product> GetBeverages()
{
    return this.CurrentDataSource
                    .Products
                    .Where(p => p.Category.Category_Name == "Beverages");
}

[WebGet]
public int AddTwoNumbers(int a, int b) 
{
    return a + b;
}

If you publish your OData endpoint via ASP.NET Web API, it's called Action, and you can define them at the level of entity sets or entities.

public class YourController : ODataController
{
        [HttpPost]
        public string GetFirstArticleTitle([FromODataUri] int key, ODataActionParameters parameters) { 
            var contains = (string)parameters["contains"] ?? "";
            return db.Articles.Where(a => a.Category.Id == key && a.Title.Contains(contains)).Select(a => a.Title).FirstOrDefault() ?? " - ";
        }
}
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