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I'm using the WPF toolkit datagrid, and I'd like to set the background color of a cell, not the row, based on the content of the cell.

For the sake of simplicity, lets say the column is called Foo and I'd like the background of the cell to be blue when Foo is 1, red when Foo is 2, Yellow when Foo is 3 and Green when Foo is greater than 3.

If I can do that, I'm pretty sure I can solve any of the more complex cases that I need to deal with.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You do this with Styles and DataTriggers. Just set your ElementStyle with your default background property, in this case Green, and add DataTriggers for the other cases:

<DataGridTextColumn Binding="{Binding WhateverIWantToDisplay}" >
  <DataGridTextColumn.ElementStyle>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}">

      <Setter Property="Background" Value="Green" />

      <Style.Triggers>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Foo}" Value="1">
          <Setter Property="Background" Value="Blue" />
        </DataTrigger>

        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Foo}" Value="2">
          <Setter Property="Background" Value="Red" />
        </DataTrigger>

        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Foo}" Value="2">
          <Setter Property="Background" Value="Yellow" />
        </DataTrigger>

      </Style.Triggers>
    </Style>
  </DataGridTextColumn.ElementStyle>
</DataGridTextColumn>

Another approach is to use a binding with a converter:

<DataGridTextColumn Binding="{Binding WhateverIWantToDisplay}" >
  <DataGridTextColumn.ElementStyle>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}">

      <Setter Property="Background"
        Value="{Binding Foo, Converter={x:Static my:FooToColorConverter.Instance}}" />

    </Style>
  </DataGridTextColumn.ElementStyle>
</DataGridTextColumn>

with this converter:

public class FooToColorConverter : IValueConverter
{
  public static readonly IValueConverter Instance = new FooToColorConverter();
  public object Convert(object value, ...
  {
    int foo = (int)value;
    return
      foo==1 ? Brushes.Blue :
      foo==2 ? Brushes.Red :
      foo==3 ? Brushes.Yellow :
      foo>3 ? Brushes.Green :
        Brushes.Transparent;  // For foo<1
  }
  public object ConvertBack(...
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }
}

Note that answer serge_gubenko gave will work as well, but only if your Foo property value never changes. This is because the Color property getter will only be called once. His solution can be improved by changing Color to a read-only DependencyProperty and updating it whenever Foo is assigned, but it is generally a bad idea to have UI-specific information like colors in your data model, so it is not recommended.

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Thank you so much. I find WPF so frustrating to work with because it tends to hide errors and just not do anything when you don't have the code right. But when it works, and when you know what you're doing, its lightning fast and easy to use. I would honestly say that WPF has the steepest learning curve of any technology I've used. Anyway, thanks again. I went with the converter because it gives me the greatest flexibility. –  Jonathan Beerhalter Nov 17 '09 at 16:26
    
Beautiful..!!! +1 from my side..!! –  samar Jun 23 '11 at 13:27

One of the ways how you could do this is to define the ElementStyle for the column and then bind the textblock background to the color property of the data element behind the datagrid row. Here's an example:

DataGridTextColumn xaml:

<DataGridTextColumn Width="SizeToCells"   
                       MinWidth="150" 
                       Binding="{Binding Name}">

    <DataGridTextColumn.ElementStyle>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}">
            <Setter Property="TextBlock.Background" Value="{Binding Color}" />
        </Style>
    </DataGridTextColumn.ElementStyle>
</DataGridTextColumn>

data item declaration:

public class TestItem
{
    public TestItem(int foo)
    {
        Foo = foo;
    }

    public int Foo { get; set; }
    public Brush Color
    {
        get
        {
            Color color = Colors.Green;
            switch (Foo)
            {
                case 1: color = Colors.Red; break;
                case 2: color = Colors.Yellow; break; 
            }
            return new SolidColorBrush(color);
        }
    }
}

hope this helps, regards

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This will not work if the value of Foo ever changes after the grid is displayed: The cell color will not update. See my answer for more details. –  Ray Burns Nov 17 '09 at 6:07
    
And neither if Foo changes (for example, because of data binding) while displaying the grid. –  greenoldman Aug 25 '10 at 12:24
    
Well its old, but all you need to fix it is to implement INotifyPropertyChanged by the class TestItem, to notify the UI of the color changes. –  Tafari Oct 28 '13 at 7:07

The serge_gubenko will work well if your item inherits From INotifyPropertyChanged then when your property will change call to NotifyPropertyChanged("yourproperty")

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