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I have a file which I want to take all the lines which starts with CDS and a line below. This lines are like:

CDS             297300..298235
                      /gene="ENSBTAG00000035659"

I found this in your site:

open(FH,'FILE');

while ($line = <FH>) {
if ($line =~ /Pattern/) {
    print "$line";
    print scalar <FH>;
}
}

and it works great when the CDS is only a line. Sometimes in my file is like

CDS             join(complement(416559..416614),complement(416381..416392),
               complement(415781..416087))
               /gene="ENSBTAG00000047603"

or with more lines in the CDS. How can I take only the CDS lines and the next line of the ID??? please i need your help! Thank you in advance.

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Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. What characterizes a continuation line? The trailing comma? –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 3 '13 at 15:49
    
Are you reading a file in a standard sequence format? If so, BioPerl may help. Just a guess since you mention genes, CDS, etc. –  indiguy Jul 3 '13 at 16:05
    
Are you wanting to keep outputting lines until the next 'CDS'? –  ethrbunny Jul 3 '13 at 16:06
    
Your follow-up question: please ask that as a new question, or as a comment on ikegami's answer if it really is a small follow-up, rather than trying to edit it in. Thanks! –  Rup Jul 4 '13 at 11:42
    
I,m sorry again for the trouble...the idea is to take account how many exons are in every CDS (the pairs of coordinates) and to compare them with another embl file. Thats why i want to store them in an array. –  Vasilis Jul 4 '13 at 13:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming the "next line" always contains /gene=, one can use the flip-flop operator.

while (<>) {
   print if m{^CDS} ... m{/gene=};
}

Otherwise, you need to parse the CDS line. It might be sufficient to count parens.

my $depth = 0;
my $print_next = 0;
while (<>) {
   if (/^CDS/) {
       print;
       $depth = tr/(// - tr/)//;
       $print_next = 1;
   }
   elsif ($depth) {
       print;
       $depth += tr/(// - tr/)//;
   }
   elsif ($print_next) {
       print;
       $print_next = 0;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
incredible!!!! it prints one or two lines more, but I will find the way to delete them. But first I must understand how it work, because it's seems a little bit magic to me... Thank you very very much. –  Vasilis Jul 3 '13 at 17:04
    
more +1 for ikegami (100K is not far off now) - I am no longer surprised when I scroll down and see your userID. I don't want to hijack things but If you do respond with further comments can you indicate why you used "..." instead of the ".." form of flip-flop here? Cheers ... –  G. Cito Jul 3 '13 at 17:09
1  
@G. Cito, Two dots checks if the last line of one block is the first line of the next block. Using three dots skips this check. That check is never going to be true, so I used three dots to avoid that check. –  ikegami Jul 3 '13 at 17:45
    
@G. Cito, ...but either would work here. –  ikegami Jul 4 '13 at 13:01
    
@Vasilis, If you have a new question, post a new question. Don't add it to an answer. –  ikegami Jul 4 '13 at 13:03

You need to break the input into outdented paragraphs. Outdented paragraphs start a non-space character in their first line and start with space characters for the rest.

Try:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# --------------------------------------

my $input_file = shift @ARGV;
my $para = undef; # holds partial paragraphs

open my $in_fh, '<', $input_file or die "could not open $input_file: $!\n";
while( my $line = <$in_fh> ){

  # paragraphs are outdented, that is, start with a non-space character
  if( $line =~ m{ \A \S }msx ){

    # don't do if very first line of file
    if( defined $para ){

      # If paragraph starts with CDS
      if( $para =~ m{ \A CDS \b }msx ){
        process_CDS( $para );
      }

      # delete the old paragraph
      $para = undef;
    }
  }

  # add the line to the paragraph,
  $para .= $line;
}
close $in_fh or die "could not close $input_file: $!\n";

# the last paragraph is not handle inside the loop, so do it now
if( defined $para ){

  # If paragraph starts with CDS
  if( $para =~ m{ \A CDS \b }msx ){
    process_CDS( $para );
  }

}
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