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There is a string: Character\5C&\22\3C\3E' I want to unescape.

There is a code for that:

package escaping;

import org.apache.commons.lang.StringEscapeUtils;

public class UnEscapingDemo {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

       String str = StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml("Character\\5C&\\22\\3C\\3E'");

       System.out.println(str);

    }

}

But in the end I have not expecting result. I have the same what I've put.. (without converting it)".

Why?

--

Edit:

I believe that "3E" here is stands for ">" .. for example

So, my expecting string is: Character\&"<>'

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Please clarify: what's the result you get, and what's the result you're expecting? –  Matt Ball Jul 3 '13 at 16:31
    
You're not putting in Html, that's the reason. I don't know what that is that you're putting in though. –  Daniel Kaplan Jul 3 '13 at 16:31
    
Is it really HTML you expect to escape here? –  fge Jul 3 '13 at 16:31
    
ok. let me think about it.. I got this value from ldap. And feel i should unescape it. –  ses Jul 3 '13 at 16:32
    
so, I believe then it is about unending but not unescaping –  ses Jul 3 '13 at 16:57

2 Answers 2

What you mention is not HTML but URI encoding. In HTML, < would be &lt; and > would be &gt;.

You should take a look at this thread, and read both Tim Cooper and Draemon posts.

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1  
This is not even URI encoding. Backslashes are not legal in URIs. –  fge Jul 3 '13 at 17:23
    
I meant that for the edit part of the question (I believe that "3E" here is stands for ">") –  ssssteffff Jul 3 '13 at 21:34

Well, that weird syntax of escaping comes from OpenLdap...

This works for me then:

 public static void main(String[] args) throws UnsupportedEncodingException {

        String input = "Character\\5C&\\22\\3C\\3E'";

       input = input.replace("\\", "%");

       String result = URLDecoder.decode(input, "UTF-8");

       System.out.println(result);

    }
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