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I am doing a class project that is the huffman algorithm. After reading a file and generating the huffman code (1s & 0s) i have to export it to a new file using bitwise operations. For some reason, when I export using the bitwise operations the file ends up even bigger than before. With a string of 1s and 0s representing the previous characters, using bitwise I have to save each 1 and 0 in chains of 8 bits. This is the code that I have:

byte currentByte = 0;
for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < binaryString.length(); i++, j++) {
    if (binaryString.charAt(i) == '1') {
        currentByte |= (byte) Math.pow(2, 7 - j);
    }
    if (i != 0 && (i % 8 == 0 || i == binaryString.length() - 1)) {
        output.writeObject(currentByte);
        if (i % 8 == 0) {
             currentByte = 0;
             j = 0;
        }
    }
}

Thank you.

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5 Answers 5

You are using ObjectOutputStream, which is intended for portable serialization of Java objects. If you want to write the single bytes you should be using a FileOutputStream instead.

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The problem is you are using the writeObject method instead of the write method.

The writeObject method writes information about the object as well as the object itself where the write method is designed to simply write a single byte.

You should also use FileOutputStream instead of ObjectOutputStream.

See: ObjectStream.write(byte)

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public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    FileOutputStream output = new FileOutputStream("C:\\temp\\t.dat");
    String inp = "1100110000110011";
    byte[] ar = new byte[1];
    int b = 0;
    int j = 0;
    int i = 0;
    while(i < inp.length())
    {
        if(inp.charAt(i) == '1')
            b |= 1 << (7-j);

        j++;
        i++;
        if(i % 8 == 0)
        {
            //StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            //sb.append(String.format("%02X ", b));
            //System.out.print(sb.toString());
            ar[0] = (byte)b;
            output.write(ar);
            j = 0;
            b = 0;
        }
    }
    output.close();
}

If you write longer sequences, you might consider using a List<byte> and then append each byte, instead of writing each byte seperatly.

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Why would you even generate a string of 1's and 0's in the first place? That's a useless extra step that can only take extra time.

The usual way to do it is to have a "buffer" of some convenient number of bits (say 32, because that's an int), writing a variable number of bits to that buffer for every symbol you encode, and draining entire bytes from the buffer.

For example, (not tested, but I've done this before)

int buffer = 0, bufbits = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < symbols.length(); i++)
{
    int s = symbols[i];
    buffer <<= lengths[s];  // make room for the bits
    bufbits += lengths[s];  // buffer got longer
    buffer |= values[s];    // put in the bits corresponding to the symbol

    while (bufbits >= 8)    // as long as there is at least a byte in the buffer
    {
        bufbits -= 8;       // forget it's there
        stream.write((byte)(buffer >>> bufbits)); // and save it
        // note: bits are not removed from the buffer, just forgotten about
        // so it will "overflow", but that is harmless.
        // you will see weird values in the debugger though
    }
}

Don't forget that something may still be in the buffer at the end of the loop. So write that out separately.

Some formats require the packing to be the other way around, that is, with the next symbol in front of the previous one in the buffer. That's a simple change though.

Using 32 bits means the maximum symbol length is 32 - 7 = 25, which is usually more than other bounds already placed on the symbol length (commonly 15 or 16). If you need more, the maximum symbol length using a long is 57. Very long lengths are inconvenient when decoding (because tables are used - no one really decodes by walking the tree bit by bit), so usually they're not used.

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You need to change the if position:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String binaryString = "1111111100000010";
    byte currentByte = 0;
    for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < binaryString.length(); i++, j++) {
        if (i != 0 && i % 8 == 0 || i == binaryString.length() - 1) {
            System.out.println(currentByte); // for debug
            currentByte = 0;
            j = 0;
        }
        if (binaryString.charAt(i) == '1') {
            currentByte |= 1 << 7 - j;
        }
    }
}

The output for the binary string:

1
2

Note that if you have 11111111, this is -1 in the byte type.

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